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Forest wetland response to nutrient enrichment on the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation

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Date Issued:
2004
Summary:
The Big Cypress Swamp and the Everglades of South Florida are inherently oligotrophic ecosystems that in recent decades have been subjected to increasing agricultural nutrient inputs. While extensive research regarding deleterious effects of nutrient impacts has been conducted in the phosphorus-deficient Everglades, there is a lack of research in Big Cypress Swamp. This 12-month field study assessed the responsiveness of Taxodium distichum, Fraxinus caroliniana, and herbaceous vegetation to increased nutrient levels in Big Cypress Swamp. Six nutrient treatments (Control, N, P, K, 2K, and PxK) were applied to the soil surrounding these trees. F. caroliniana had higher photosynthetic rates with 2K treatments and higher growth rates with PxK treatments. T. distichum had higher Leaf Area Index in the P and PxK treatment but did not exhibit other responses to treatment. Herbaceous vegetation showed little response to treatments. This study concluded that potassium may be co-limiting in this ecosystem.
Title: Forest wetland response to nutrient enrichment on the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation.
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Name(s): Jacobs, Alyssa B.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Volin, John C., Thesis advisor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Biological Sciences
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, FL
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 57 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The Big Cypress Swamp and the Everglades of South Florida are inherently oligotrophic ecosystems that in recent decades have been subjected to increasing agricultural nutrient inputs. While extensive research regarding deleterious effects of nutrient impacts has been conducted in the phosphorus-deficient Everglades, there is a lack of research in Big Cypress Swamp. This 12-month field study assessed the responsiveness of Taxodium distichum, Fraxinus caroliniana, and herbaceous vegetation to increased nutrient levels in Big Cypress Swamp. Six nutrient treatments (Control, N, P, K, 2K, and PxK) were applied to the soil surrounding these trees. F. caroliniana had higher photosynthetic rates with 2K treatments and higher growth rates with PxK treatments. T. distichum had higher Leaf Area Index in the P and PxK treatment but did not exhibit other responses to treatment. Herbaceous vegetation showed little response to treatments. This study concluded that potassium may be co-limiting in this ecosystem.
Identifier: 9780496239375 (isbn), 13129 (digitool), FADT13129 (IID), fau:9992 (fedora)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2004.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Subject(s): Wetland ecology--Florida
Restoration ecology--Florida
Everglades (Fla )
Big Cypress Swamp (Fla )
Seminole Indians--Florida
Seminole Tribe of Florida
Discrimination learning
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/13129
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.