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Influences of perceived parenting and attachment style on change in self-esteem during middle childhood

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Date Issued:
2003
Summary:
This study examined influences of perceived parental behaviors and attachment styles on change over time in preadolescents' feelings of self-worth. In each of two successive years, four measures of perceived parental behavior (harassment, over-protectiveness, monitoring, and affectionate contact), two measures of attachment style (preoccupied coping and avoidant coping), and one measure of global self-worth were collected from a sample of 106 children ( M age = 11.1 years in Year 1). Results support the idea that children's perceptions of their parents and attachment styles influence, both individually and jointly, their subsequent feelings of self-worth. Perceived parental monitoring and perceived affectionate contact predicted increases in self-esteem, whereas perceived parental harassment predicted decreases in feelings of self-worth over time. Children's attachment styles also predicted change in global self-worth and in fact mediated the relations between perceived parenting practices and subsequent feelings of self worth.
Title: Influences of perceived parenting and attachment style on change in self-esteem during middle childhood.
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Name(s): Vagi, Kevin J.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Perry, David G., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2003
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 48 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This study examined influences of perceived parental behaviors and attachment styles on change over time in preadolescents' feelings of self-worth. In each of two successive years, four measures of perceived parental behavior (harassment, over-protectiveness, monitoring, and affectionate contact), two measures of attachment style (preoccupied coping and avoidant coping), and one measure of global self-worth were collected from a sample of 106 children ( M age = 11.1 years in Year 1). Results support the idea that children's perceptions of their parents and attachment styles influence, both individually and jointly, their subsequent feelings of self-worth. Perceived parental monitoring and perceived affectionate contact predicted increases in self-esteem, whereas perceived parental harassment predicted decreases in feelings of self-worth over time. Children's attachment styles also predicted change in global self-worth and in fact mediated the relations between perceived parenting practices and subsequent feelings of self worth.
Identifier: 9780496219162 (isbn), 13078 (digitool), FADT13078 (IID), fau:9942 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2003.
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Subject(s): Parent and child
Parental acceptance
Self-esteem in children
Attachment behavior in children
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/13078
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.