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RAISING THE BAR: HISPANIC/LATIN* HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES IN AN EARLY COLLEGE PROGRAM

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Date Issued:
2023
Abstract/Description:
As the Hispanic/Latin* population in the United States experiences rapid growth, a concerning decline in college completion rates among these students demands further investigation. This study aims to establish an understanding of historical disparities that pervade the provision of advanced education and experiences, which consequently impact access to postsecondary education for Hispanic/Latin* students. Given the heightened likelihood of encountering such disparities within this demographic, the pursuit of college degree attainment goals may necessitate particular emphasis. Utilizing Self-Determination Theory (SDT) as a foundation, the satisfaction of the three basic psychological needs—competence, autonomy, and relatedness—can be examined to elucidate how students’ intrinsic motivations are influenced by their interests and needs. As the nation grapples with equity challenges, identifying opportunities to expedite progress toward academic goals is crucial. This phenomenological study delves into the lived experiences of Hispanic/Latin* high school students who have opted for accelerated university curricula. The research investigates the impetus behind participation in dual-enrollment/early-college programs and the subsequent impact on undergraduate degree attainment. Employing an SDT framework, the motivational constructs affecting persistence are analyzed to address the question, "How does participation in a dual-enrollment/early-college curriculum influence undergraduate degree attainment?" Answering this query provides an essential foundation for educational researchers, policymakers, and school personnel to address the factors contributing to the low undergraduate degree attainment rates among Hispanic/Latin* students. A comprehensive understanding of SDT’s core tenets can reveal the significance of self-efficacy and motivation, as well as the adjustment experiences of Hispanic/Latin* high school students attending university full-time. By eliminating barriers to accelerated programs such as dual enrollment, positive implications for employment and socioeconomic equity are likely to ensue, propelling the United States toward becoming a global leader in college degree attainment.
Title: RAISING THE BAR: HISPANIC/LATIN* HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES IN AN EARLY COLLEGE PROGRAM.
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Name(s): Taylor, Pilar Forero , author
Willems, Patricia , Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Curriculum, Culture, and Educational Inquiry
College of Education
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2023
Date Issued: 2023
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 148 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: As the Hispanic/Latin* population in the United States experiences rapid growth, a concerning decline in college completion rates among these students demands further investigation. This study aims to establish an understanding of historical disparities that pervade the provision of advanced education and experiences, which consequently impact access to postsecondary education for Hispanic/Latin* students. Given the heightened likelihood of encountering such disparities within this demographic, the pursuit of college degree attainment goals may necessitate particular emphasis. Utilizing Self-Determination Theory (SDT) as a foundation, the satisfaction of the three basic psychological needs—competence, autonomy, and relatedness—can be examined to elucidate how students’ intrinsic motivations are influenced by their interests and needs. As the nation grapples with equity challenges, identifying opportunities to expedite progress toward academic goals is crucial. This phenomenological study delves into the lived experiences of Hispanic/Latin* high school students who have opted for accelerated university curricula. The research investigates the impetus behind participation in dual-enrollment/early-college programs and the subsequent impact on undergraduate degree attainment. Employing an SDT framework, the motivational constructs affecting persistence are analyzed to address the question, "How does participation in a dual-enrollment/early-college curriculum influence undergraduate degree attainment?" Answering this query provides an essential foundation for educational researchers, policymakers, and school personnel to address the factors contributing to the low undergraduate degree attainment rates among Hispanic/Latin* students. A comprehensive understanding of SDT’s core tenets can reveal the significance of self-efficacy and motivation, as well as the adjustment experiences of Hispanic/Latin* high school students attending university full-time. By eliminating barriers to accelerated programs such as dual enrollment, positive implications for employment and socioeconomic equity are likely to ensue, propelling the United States toward becoming a global leader in college degree attainment.
Identifier: FA00014335 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (PhD)--Florida Atlantic University, 2023.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Hispanic American high school students
Dual enrollment
Educational attainment
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00014335
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Host Institution: FAU