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Predictors of BRCA1/2 genetic testing among Black women with breast cancer: a population-based study

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Date Issued:
2017
Summary:
Evidence shows that Black women diagnosed with breast cancer are substantially less likely to undergo BRCA testing and other multipanel genetic testing compared to White women, despite having a higher incidence of early-age onset breast cancer and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Our study identifies predictors of BRCA testing among Black women treated for breast cancer and examines differences between BRCA testers and nontesters. We conducted an analysis of 945 Black women ages 18–64 diagnosed with localized or regional-stage invasive breast cancer in Pennsylvania and Florida between 2007 and 2009. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of BRCA 1/2 testing. Few (27%) (n = 252) of the participants reported having BRCA testing. In the multivariate analysis, we found that perceived benefits of BRCA testing (predisposing factor) ([OR], 1.16; 95% CI: 1.11–1.21; P < 0.001), income (enabling factor) ([OR], 2.10; 95% CI: 1.16–3.80; p = 0.014), and BRCA mutation risk category (need factor) ([OR], 3.78; 95% CI: 2.31–6.19; P < 0.001) predicted BRCA testing. These results suggest that interventions to reduce disparities in BRCA testing should focus on identifying patients with high risk of mutation, increasing patient understanding of the benefits of BRCA testing, and removing financial and other administrative barriers to genetic testing.
Title: Predictors of BRCA1/2 genetic testing among Black women with breast cancer: a population-based study.
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Name(s): Tarsha Jones
Anne Marie McCarthy
Younji Kim
Katrina Armstrong
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Physical Form: pdf
Extent: 12 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Evidence shows that Black women diagnosed with breast cancer are substantially less likely to undergo BRCA testing and other multipanel genetic testing compared to White women, despite having a higher incidence of early-age onset breast cancer and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Our study identifies predictors of BRCA testing among Black women treated for breast cancer and examines differences between BRCA testers and nontesters. We conducted an analysis of 945 Black women ages 18–64 diagnosed with localized or regional-stage invasive breast cancer in Pennsylvania and Florida between 2007 and 2009. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of BRCA 1/2 testing. Few (27%) (n = 252) of the participants reported having BRCA testing. In the multivariate analysis, we found that perceived benefits of BRCA testing (predisposing factor) ([OR], 1.16; 95% CI: 1.11–1.21; P < 0.001), income (enabling factor) ([OR], 2.10; 95% CI: 1.16–3.80; p = 0.014), and BRCA mutation risk category (need factor) ([OR], 3.78; 95% CI: 2.31–6.19; P < 0.001) predicted BRCA testing. These results suggest that interventions to reduce disparities in BRCA testing should focus on identifying patients with high risk of mutation, increasing patient understanding of the benefits of BRCA testing, and removing financial and other administrative barriers to genetic testing.
Identifier: FAUIR000509 (IID)
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FAUIR000509
Host Institution: FAU

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