You are here

In Pursuit of Perceptions: Priming Intervention during a Goal-Directed Behavioral Task

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2023
Abstract/Description:
Learning to effectively execute goal-directed tasks generally requires guidance from knowledgeable experts that can direct the performer’s attention toward important environmental features. However, specifying the optimal attentional strategies is difficult due to the subjective nature of perceptions and the complexity of the underlying neural processes. The current skill acquisition literature emphasizes action-based contingencies through Predictive and Ecological models when examining attentional processes, while Perceptual Control Theory advocates for perceptual-based mechanisms. To evaluate the efficacy of these models, this study implicitly primed one hundred fifteen participants to focus on action-based or perceptual-based aspects during an interceptive task. It was predicted that the perceptual-based priming condition would result in faster learning and greater resilience to environmental disturbances. However, the highly variable results did not show significant differences in learning rate or resilience between the action and perceptual-based conditions. Ultimately, the variability in the findings suggests that a superior performance depends on numerous factors unique to each performer. Consequently, instructional methods cannot rely on a single optimal attentional strategy for gathering environmental information. Instead, the dynamic interplay between the individual and the environment must be considered to foster the skill development of novice performers.
Title: In Pursuit of Perceptions: Priming Intervention during a Goal-Directed Behavioral Task.
0 views
0 downloads
Name(s): Osei, Peter Claudius, author
Barenholtz, Elan, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Psychology
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2023
Date Issued: 2023
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 69 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Learning to effectively execute goal-directed tasks generally requires guidance from knowledgeable experts that can direct the performer’s attention toward important environmental features. However, specifying the optimal attentional strategies is difficult due to the subjective nature of perceptions and the complexity of the underlying neural processes. The current skill acquisition literature emphasizes action-based contingencies through Predictive and Ecological models when examining attentional processes, while Perceptual Control Theory advocates for perceptual-based mechanisms. To evaluate the efficacy of these models, this study implicitly primed one hundred fifteen participants to focus on action-based or perceptual-based aspects during an interceptive task. It was predicted that the perceptual-based priming condition would result in faster learning and greater resilience to environmental disturbances. However, the highly variable results did not show significant differences in learning rate or resilience between the action and perceptual-based conditions. Ultimately, the variability in the findings suggests that a superior performance depends on numerous factors unique to each performer. Consequently, instructional methods cannot rely on a single optimal attentional strategy for gathering environmental information. Instead, the dynamic interplay between the individual and the environment must be considered to foster the skill development of novice performers.
Identifier: FA00014290 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (MA)--Florida Atlantic University, 2023.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Perception
Attention
Cognitive psychology--Research
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00014290
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Host Institution: FAU