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THE MANTEÑO OF BOLA DE ORO: PAST HUMAN RESILIENCY TO CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH REMOTE SENSING, EXCAVATION, AND CHRONOLOGICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF LANDSCAPE MODIFICATIONS

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Date Issued:
2023
Abstract/Description:
The term "collapse" has become a widely used term that oversimplifies the intricate histories of human-environment interactions. It has contributed to the belief that civilizations in the Americas and the tropics could not endure over time. However, the Manteño civilization of the Ecuadorian coast challenges this notion. Flourishing for a thousand years (ca. 650–1700 CE), the Manteños inhabited the neotropics at the gates of one of the world's most influential climatic forces, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To thrive, the Manteños needed to navigate the extremes of ENSO during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, ca. 950–1250 CE) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1400–1700 CE) while capitalizing on ENSO's milder phases. This research uses change detection analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) on Landsat satellite imagery under various ENSO conditions from 1986 to 2020 in southern Manabí, where the 16th-century Manteño territory of Salangome was situated. The findings indicate that the cloud forests found in the highest elevations of the Chongón-Colonche Mountains provide the most resilient environment in the region to adapt to a changing climate. Further investigations of the cloud forest of the Bola de Oro Mountain using Uncrewed Aerial Vehicles (UAV) equipped with LiDAR, ground-truthing, and excavation uncovered a landscape shaped by the Manteños.
Title: THE MANTEÑO OF BOLA DE ORO: PAST HUMAN RESILIENCY TO CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH REMOTE SENSING, EXCAVATION, AND CHRONOLOGICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF LANDSCAPE MODIFICATIONS.
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Name(s): Garzón-Oechsle, Andrés E., author
Johanson, Erik , Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Geosciences
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2023
Date Issued: 2023
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 267 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The term "collapse" has become a widely used term that oversimplifies the intricate histories of human-environment interactions. It has contributed to the belief that civilizations in the Americas and the tropics could not endure over time. However, the Manteño civilization of the Ecuadorian coast challenges this notion. Flourishing for a thousand years (ca. 650–1700 CE), the Manteños inhabited the neotropics at the gates of one of the world's most influential climatic forces, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To thrive, the Manteños needed to navigate the extremes of ENSO during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, ca. 950–1250 CE) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1400–1700 CE) while capitalizing on ENSO's milder phases. This research uses change detection analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) on Landsat satellite imagery under various ENSO conditions from 1986 to 2020 in southern Manabí, where the 16th-century Manteño territory of Salangome was situated. The findings indicate that the cloud forests found in the highest elevations of the Chongón-Colonche Mountains provide the most resilient environment in the region to adapt to a changing climate. Further investigations of the cloud forest of the Bola de Oro Mountain using Uncrewed Aerial Vehicles (UAV) equipped with LiDAR, ground-truthing, and excavation uncovered a landscape shaped by the Manteños.
Identifier: FA00014225 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (PhD)--Florida Atlantic University, 2023.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Climate change
Remote sensing
Archaeology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00014225
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Host Institution: FAU