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THERE IS NO “I” IN TEAM: IMPACTS OF SURGICAL TEAM DYNAMICS ON OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE AND CLINICAL OUTCOMES

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Date Issued:
2023
Abstract/Description:
While the complexities and challenges facing healthcare continue to grow, the focus on improving surgical practices remains constant. Possessing a strong influence over patient referral patterns, public reputation/prominence, and financial performance, surgical practices command heightened attention on operational performance and clinical outcomes. Executive leadership cannot support (nor improve) a surgical practice without comprehending the importance of team dynamics in the operating room (OR) environment. Previous literature offers mixed and incomplete results on themes of team familiarity and OR efficiency, frequently citing handoffs, late starts, and task disruptions as catalysts for negative performance. Studies routinely use historical interaction counts to measure team familiarity, which often neglect the degree of participation (engagement) across prior experiences. Similarly, counts of handoffs or individuals entering an OR do not offer an accurate assessment of team performance. Guided by historical studies, four hypotheses are presented and argue that enhancing surgical team dynamics yield favorable improvements for operational performance and clinical outcomes. Utilizing data from 9,049 neurologic surgery cases performed at two separate campuses (belonging to the same organization) over a three-year timeframe (March 2019 to November 2021), this study measures surgical team dynamics in a highly complex setting through the lens of case continuity and surgeon familiarity to assess key outputs: case scheduling errors (proxy for operational performance) and post-operative complications within 30-days of surgery (proxy for clinical outcomes).
Title: THERE IS NO “I” IN TEAM: IMPACTS OF SURGICAL TEAM DYNAMICS ON OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE AND CLINICAL OUTCOMES.
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Name(s): Hasse, Christopher H. , author
Behara, Ravi S., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Information Technology and Operations Management
College of Business
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2023
Date Issued: 2023
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 119p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: While the complexities and challenges facing healthcare continue to grow, the focus on improving surgical practices remains constant. Possessing a strong influence over patient referral patterns, public reputation/prominence, and financial performance, surgical practices command heightened attention on operational performance and clinical outcomes. Executive leadership cannot support (nor improve) a surgical practice without comprehending the importance of team dynamics in the operating room (OR) environment. Previous literature offers mixed and incomplete results on themes of team familiarity and OR efficiency, frequently citing handoffs, late starts, and task disruptions as catalysts for negative performance. Studies routinely use historical interaction counts to measure team familiarity, which often neglect the degree of participation (engagement) across prior experiences. Similarly, counts of handoffs or individuals entering an OR do not offer an accurate assessment of team performance. Guided by historical studies, four hypotheses are presented and argue that enhancing surgical team dynamics yield favorable improvements for operational performance and clinical outcomes. Utilizing data from 9,049 neurologic surgery cases performed at two separate campuses (belonging to the same organization) over a three-year timeframe (March 2019 to November 2021), this study measures surgical team dynamics in a highly complex setting through the lens of case continuity and surgeon familiarity to assess key outputs: case scheduling errors (proxy for operational performance) and post-operative complications within 30-days of surgery (proxy for clinical outcomes).
Identifier: FA00014137 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (PhD)--Florida Atlantic University, 2023.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Surgery
Operating room personnel
Healthcare management
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00014137
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.