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ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON COMMON SNOOK (CENTROPOMUS UNDECIMALIS) MOVEMENT IN THE ST. LUCIE ESTUARY

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Date Issued:
2022
Abstract/Description:
Estuarine ecosystems are dynamic habitats, where the convergence of marine and freshwater results in constant fluxes in environmental abiotic parameters. Organisms must balance these variations within their optimal range to minimize physiological costs, often by movement from unsuitable to more suitable areas. Additional disruptions to ecosystem balances, such as anthropogenic hydrologic discharges, further alter environmental conditions and may cause population-wide movement responses of mobile organisms. Responses to anthropogenic and natural fluctuations can differ based on time of year, life history stage, or individual characteristics. These ecologically-balanced dynamics are difficult to model. In this study, I examined variability in estuarine environmental data and common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) movement responses to anthropogenic and natural fluctuations in the environment in a managed waterway. ARIMA time series models were tested as a method of modeling variability in environmental parameters. Monthly variance was well described throughout most of the estuary, especially when the interannual and intra-annual patterns were stable, indicating that these models are a good method for these types of data and could be appropriate for forecasting. Euryhaline sportfish movement responses to high discharge events in a managed waterway were observed with passive acoustic telemetry and did not show large-scale, population-wide consistency. Responses were variable between and within individuals, but individual characteristics appear to have influenced behavior in response to disturbances. Thus, these sportfish populations may be more resilient to this type of disturbance than previously hypothesized. Generalized additive mixed effects models showed that the distribution and movement of individual fishes varied in response to multiple natural and anthropogenic factors, and there was no primary driver. The understanding of the relationships among the distribution and movement of fishes and abiotic and anthropogenic factors can guide management of waterways and provide insight into how changes will affect abiotic factors and communities.
Title: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON COMMON SNOOK (CENTROPOMUS UNDECIMALIS) MOVEMENT IN THE ST. LUCIE ESTUARY.
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Name(s): Kleiman, Lauren E. , author
Baldwin, John , Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Biological Sciences
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2022
Date Issued: 2022
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 166 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Estuarine ecosystems are dynamic habitats, where the convergence of marine and freshwater results in constant fluxes in environmental abiotic parameters. Organisms must balance these variations within their optimal range to minimize physiological costs, often by movement from unsuitable to more suitable areas. Additional disruptions to ecosystem balances, such as anthropogenic hydrologic discharges, further alter environmental conditions and may cause population-wide movement responses of mobile organisms. Responses to anthropogenic and natural fluctuations can differ based on time of year, life history stage, or individual characteristics. These ecologically-balanced dynamics are difficult to model. In this study, I examined variability in estuarine environmental data and common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) movement responses to anthropogenic and natural fluctuations in the environment in a managed waterway. ARIMA time series models were tested as a method of modeling variability in environmental parameters. Monthly variance was well described throughout most of the estuary, especially when the interannual and intra-annual patterns were stable, indicating that these models are a good method for these types of data and could be appropriate for forecasting. Euryhaline sportfish movement responses to high discharge events in a managed waterway were observed with passive acoustic telemetry and did not show large-scale, population-wide consistency. Responses were variable between and within individuals, but individual characteristics appear to have influenced behavior in response to disturbances. Thus, these sportfish populations may be more resilient to this type of disturbance than previously hypothesized. Generalized additive mixed effects models showed that the distribution and movement of individual fishes varied in response to multiple natural and anthropogenic factors, and there was no primary driver. The understanding of the relationships among the distribution and movement of fishes and abiotic and anthropogenic factors can guide management of waterways and provide insight into how changes will affect abiotic factors and communities.
Identifier: FA00013995 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2022.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Snook
Saint Lucie River Estuary (Fla.)
Estuarine ecology
Underwater acoustic telemetry
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013995
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.