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INVESTIGATING DEPRESSIONAL FEATURES ASSOCIATED WITH SINKHOLES IN DEEP-SEATED INTERSTRATAL KARST USING NEAR-SURFACE SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES IN CENTRAL FLORIDA.

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Date Issued:
2022
Abstract/Description:
Sinkholes are one of the major geohazards in karst areas, causing significant economic damage and even occasional loss of life. Sinkhole formation mechanisms vary depending on geological conditions but are initiated by dissolution of bedrock (generally carbonates or evaporites) below the ground resulting in ground surface deformation and eventual collapse. The process may be accelerated by natural events like storms or heavy rains and droughts, or human activities like water pumping or loading of the land surface. In Florida, limestone dissolution leading to sinkhole development often results in the formation of surface depressions that are often water-filled and develop into depressional wetlands. Previous studies using near-surface geophysical imaging techniques (including seismic refraction) in Central Florida have shown the correspondence between depressional wetlands and sinkholes originated in deep-seated interstratal karst with a variable overburden. However, these geophysical techniques are often unable to reach the karst interface which may typically be positioned at depths exceeding < 50-60 m. This research investigates the use of ground-based seismic reflection techniques to image deep paleokarst relief and better understand sinkhole development and extent below the overburden. This approach follows earlier studies by others using seismic reflection methods to identify sinkholes under lakes in Central Florida. While these previous studies deployed the method over water, the approach here investigates how land-based near-surface seismic reflection surveys may provide similar results below depressional wetlands. A total of three different locations with depressional wetlands under similar geological conditions (but somewhat variable depth to the karst interface) are investigated, including the Disney Wilderness Preserve near Poinciana (FL), the Allapattah Flats Wildlife Management Area near Palm City (FL); and the J.W. Corbett Wildlife Management Area in Palm Beach County (FL).
Title: INVESTIGATING DEPRESSIONAL FEATURES ASSOCIATED WITH SINKHOLES IN DEEP-SEATED INTERSTRATAL KARST USING NEAR-SURFACE SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES IN CENTRAL FLORIDA.
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Name(s): Khan, Haibat , author
Comas, Xavier , Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Geosciences
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2022
Date Issued: 2022
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 63 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Sinkholes are one of the major geohazards in karst areas, causing significant economic damage and even occasional loss of life. Sinkhole formation mechanisms vary depending on geological conditions but are initiated by dissolution of bedrock (generally carbonates or evaporites) below the ground resulting in ground surface deformation and eventual collapse. The process may be accelerated by natural events like storms or heavy rains and droughts, or human activities like water pumping or loading of the land surface. In Florida, limestone dissolution leading to sinkhole development often results in the formation of surface depressions that are often water-filled and develop into depressional wetlands. Previous studies using near-surface geophysical imaging techniques (including seismic refraction) in Central Florida have shown the correspondence between depressional wetlands and sinkholes originated in deep-seated interstratal karst with a variable overburden. However, these geophysical techniques are often unable to reach the karst interface which may typically be positioned at depths exceeding < 50-60 m. This research investigates the use of ground-based seismic reflection techniques to image deep paleokarst relief and better understand sinkhole development and extent below the overburden. This approach follows earlier studies by others using seismic reflection methods to identify sinkholes under lakes in Central Florida. While these previous studies deployed the method over water, the approach here investigates how land-based near-surface seismic reflection surveys may provide similar results below depressional wetlands. A total of three different locations with depressional wetlands under similar geological conditions (but somewhat variable depth to the karst interface) are investigated, including the Disney Wilderness Preserve near Poinciana (FL), the Allapattah Flats Wildlife Management Area near Palm City (FL); and the J.W. Corbett Wildlife Management Area in Palm Beach County (FL).
Identifier: FA00013957 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (MS)--Florida Atlantic University, 2022.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Sinkholes--Florida
Karst
Imaging systems in geophysics
Seismic reflection method
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013957
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.