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Development of a predictive model for faculty integration of technology in higher education

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Date Issued:
2000
Summary:
The purpose of this research project was to develop a predictive model for faculty integration of technology in higher education, specifically among faculty who are members of the Commission of Professors of Adult Education. The variables included both those that the educational institution could affect, such as technical support, release time, tenure and promotion opportunities, and personal variables of faculty, such as computer self-efficacy, attitudes towards computers and perceived institutional support. Three hundred and eighty-nine (389) surveys were mailed to the sample participants. One hundred and twenty-four (124) were returned completed, thirty-six were returned undeliverable and seven were deemed unusable, for a return rate of 33.14%. The survey used in this study, the "Instructional Technology Integration Assessment" was adapted from the Computer Self Efficacy Scale (CSE), developed by Murphey and others (1988) and the Middle Tennessee State University Survey developed by Lea, Brace and Roberts (1998). Multiple regression was performed, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to determine which of the variables showed a stronger influence on the dependent variable. Integration of technology significantly correlated with five of the variables: Job Satisfaction (.403, p < .001); Quality of My Instruction (.422, p < .001); Tenure and Promotion Opportunities (.240, p < .05); and the Impact of Technology on the Depth and Breadth of Content and Student Participation (.347, p < .001). Years Teaching in Higher Education was negatively correlated with Integration (-.185, p < .05). With a multiple regression correlation coefficient (R) of .550, the squared multiple correlation coefficient (R2) resulted in .303. Thirty percent (30%) of the variance in integration could be accounted for by the predictor variables. Analysis of responses to open-ended questions revealed three main themes in regards to barriers and incentives for technology integration: psycho/social barriers, student readiness barriers and institutional barriers. Suggestions for future research included adding variables such as learning style, teaching style and fear of change to the overall survey.
Title: Development of a predictive model for faculty integration of technology in higher education.
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Name(s): Hargrove, Debra L.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Guglielmino, Lucy M., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2000
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 153 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this research project was to develop a predictive model for faculty integration of technology in higher education, specifically among faculty who are members of the Commission of Professors of Adult Education. The variables included both those that the educational institution could affect, such as technical support, release time, tenure and promotion opportunities, and personal variables of faculty, such as computer self-efficacy, attitudes towards computers and perceived institutional support. Three hundred and eighty-nine (389) surveys were mailed to the sample participants. One hundred and twenty-four (124) were returned completed, thirty-six were returned undeliverable and seven were deemed unusable, for a return rate of 33.14%. The survey used in this study, the "Instructional Technology Integration Assessment" was adapted from the Computer Self Efficacy Scale (CSE), developed by Murphey and others (1988) and the Middle Tennessee State University Survey developed by Lea, Brace and Roberts (1998). Multiple regression was performed, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to determine which of the variables showed a stronger influence on the dependent variable. Integration of technology significantly correlated with five of the variables: Job Satisfaction (.403, p < .001); Quality of My Instruction (.422, p < .001); Tenure and Promotion Opportunities (.240, p < .05); and the Impact of Technology on the Depth and Breadth of Content and Student Participation (.347, p < .001). Years Teaching in Higher Education was negatively correlated with Integration (-.185, p < .05). With a multiple regression correlation coefficient (R) of .550, the squared multiple correlation coefficient (R2) resulted in .303. Thirty percent (30%) of the variance in integration could be accounted for by the predictor variables. Analysis of responses to open-ended questions revealed three main themes in regards to barriers and incentives for technology integration: psycho/social barriers, student readiness barriers and institutional barriers. Suggestions for future research included adding variables such as learning style, teaching style and fear of change to the overall survey.
Identifier: 9780599651074 (isbn), 12633 (digitool), FADT12633 (IID), fau:9516 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Education
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2000.
Subject(s): Educational technology
Adult education teachers
Information technology
Education, Higher--Data processing
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12633
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.