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investigation of relationships between school culture and leadership social interest

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Date Issued:
1999
Summary:
This study investigated the relationship between school learning culture and leadership social interest in three groups of schools. Group One included schools attempting to improve student performance through participating in a staff development consortium. Group Two schools, also members of the staff development consortium, had made an additional commitment to participate in an action research process to improve student achievement. Group Three schools were designated as community schools. Four research questions were explored: (a) Is there a relationship between school leadership social interest and school learning culture? (b) Is there a relationship between school leadership social interest and school type? (c) Are there differences in school leadership and faculty perception of school learning culture? and (d) Are there differences in school learning culture by school type? Data were voluntarily submitted by 12 schools that were members of the South Florida Center for Educational Leaders Consortium of Schools or were Broward County Community Schools. School administrators and teacher leaders completed the Basic Adlerian Scales for Interpersonal Success (BASIS-A Inventory). School leadership and faculty completed the School Professional Staff as Learning Community (SPSLC) and a demographic questionnaire. A total of 289 questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of (46%). Major findings include: (a) a significant relationship exists between school leadership social interest and the fourth school culture subscale (r = .33, p < .01) concerning the faculty's capacity to observe and give feedback on classroom behaviors to increase capacity; (b) Group One and Group Two schools differed on the second (F = 5.993, df = 288, p < .003) and fifth (F = 3.846, df = 288, p < .022) subscales of the SPSLO, concerning shared visioning and school conditions and capacity for continuous learning respectively; and (c) Group Two and Group Three schools differed on subscale three (F = 3.947, df = 288, p < .020), which assessed the collective creativity and learning of the organization. Leadership social interest is correlated to trusting learning environments that facilitate transformational learning. This study supports the literature describing learning organization leaders as being teachers, leaders, and designers, all of which are equated to social interest.
Title: An investigation of relationships between school culture and leadership social interest.
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Name(s): Knutson, Kimberly Ann.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Guglielmino, Lucy M., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1999
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 124 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This study investigated the relationship between school learning culture and leadership social interest in three groups of schools. Group One included schools attempting to improve student performance through participating in a staff development consortium. Group Two schools, also members of the staff development consortium, had made an additional commitment to participate in an action research process to improve student achievement. Group Three schools were designated as community schools. Four research questions were explored: (a) Is there a relationship between school leadership social interest and school learning culture? (b) Is there a relationship between school leadership social interest and school type? (c) Are there differences in school leadership and faculty perception of school learning culture? and (d) Are there differences in school learning culture by school type? Data were voluntarily submitted by 12 schools that were members of the South Florida Center for Educational Leaders Consortium of Schools or were Broward County Community Schools. School administrators and teacher leaders completed the Basic Adlerian Scales for Interpersonal Success (BASIS-A Inventory). School leadership and faculty completed the School Professional Staff as Learning Community (SPSLC) and a demographic questionnaire. A total of 289 questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of (46%). Major findings include: (a) a significant relationship exists between school leadership social interest and the fourth school culture subscale (r = .33, p < .01) concerning the faculty's capacity to observe and give feedback on classroom behaviors to increase capacity; (b) Group One and Group Two schools differed on the second (F = 5.993, df = 288, p < .003) and fifth (F = 3.846, df = 288, p < .022) subscales of the SPSLO, concerning shared visioning and school conditions and capacity for continuous learning respectively; and (c) Group Two and Group Three schools differed on subscale three (F = 3.947, df = 288, p < .020), which assessed the collective creativity and learning of the organization. Leadership social interest is correlated to trusting learning environments that facilitate transformational learning. This study supports the literature describing learning organization leaders as being teachers, leaders, and designers, all of which are equated to social interest.
Identifier: 9780599378100 (isbn), 12603 (digitool), FADT12603 (IID), fau:9488 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Education
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1999.
Subject(s): Education, Administration
Education, Adult and Continuing
Education, Educational Psychology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12603
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.