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Florida local government compliance with transportation concurrency

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Date Issued:
1997
Summary:
Growth management grew as a concept and policy objective in the 1970s and 1980s. The interrelationships of the state and local governments changed when Florida developed growth policy and local government implemented the policy. Nine mandatory elements to be included in a local comprehensive plan and seven mandatory concurrency elements of the 1985 Florida Growth Management Act were expensive elements for local government to implement. As a result, the issue of funding the impacts of growth drove the growth management agenda, leaving the question of compliance. The question is: Did Florida local government comply with the transportation concurrency element of the Florida Growth Management Act? This dissertation analyzed five Florida counties and two Georgia counties to determine whether there was compliance with their respective state transportation policies. The study purposely looked at counties in different stages of growth to determine if the transportation requirements of the Florida Growth Management Act and the Georgia State Planning Act affected local budgets. Transportation is the most expensive element in local government budgets. Development orders would cease without the road capacity to carry the impact of proposed developments, making transportation the linchpin to state growth policies. A visual analysis and a multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate local government compliance with state transportation policy. A two-stage numerical evaluation was used for the visual analysis. The analysis looked for a slope change, a break in the trend, or both, after the impact of the intervention of the interrupted time series. A multiple regression analysis calculated the regression coefficient for a before and after dummy variable. The multiple regression removed the effects of population, interest rates, and road expenditure variables and isolated the effect of the dummy variable to determine local government compliance.
Title: Florida local government compliance with transportation concurrency.
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Name(s): Liberti, Raymond A.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Mendell, Jay S., Thesis Advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 1997
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 196 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Growth management grew as a concept and policy objective in the 1970s and 1980s. The interrelationships of the state and local governments changed when Florida developed growth policy and local government implemented the policy. Nine mandatory elements to be included in a local comprehensive plan and seven mandatory concurrency elements of the 1985 Florida Growth Management Act were expensive elements for local government to implement. As a result, the issue of funding the impacts of growth drove the growth management agenda, leaving the question of compliance. The question is: Did Florida local government comply with the transportation concurrency element of the Florida Growth Management Act? This dissertation analyzed five Florida counties and two Georgia counties to determine whether there was compliance with their respective state transportation policies. The study purposely looked at counties in different stages of growth to determine if the transportation requirements of the Florida Growth Management Act and the Georgia State Planning Act affected local budgets. Transportation is the most expensive element in local government budgets. Development orders would cease without the road capacity to carry the impact of proposed developments, making transportation the linchpin to state growth policies. A visual analysis and a multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate local government compliance with state transportation policy. A two-stage numerical evaluation was used for the visual analysis. The analysis looked for a slope change, a break in the trend, or both, after the impact of the intervention of the interrupted time series. A multiple regression analysis calculated the regression coefficient for a before and after dummy variable. The multiple regression removed the effects of population, interest rates, and road expenditure variables and isolated the effect of the dummy variable to determine local government compliance.
Identifier: 9780591616828 (isbn), 12533 (digitool), FADT12533 (IID), fau:9424 (fedora)
Note(s): Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1997.
Subject(s): Urban policy--Florida
Transportation--Planning
Cities and towns--Growth
Florida--Politics and government
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12533
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.