You are here

Flexible modification of biological coordination: The recruitment and suppression of degrees of freedom

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
1996
Summary:
The dynamics of recruitment and suppression processes are studied in the coupled pendulum paradigm developed by Kugler and Turvey (1987). Experimentally, the main concern is whether pendulum motion in this task is purely planar. Theoretically, the main concern is whether one-dimensional phase equations developed originally by Haken, Kelso and Bunz (1985) and the symmetry breaking extension by Kelso, Delcolle and Schoner (1990), can capture the richness of the dynamics of this experimental model system. In experiment 1, subjects swung single hand-held pendulums in time with an auditory metronome whose frequency increased. Bifurcations from planar to spherical pendulum motion occurred at critical cycling frequencies. Typically, these frequencies were above the pendulum's eigenfrequency. Spectral measures showed that spherical pendulum motion was generated through the recruitment of wrist abduction and adduction. The spectral measures revealed that elbow flexion and extension was recruited as movement rate increased, presumably to stabilize pendulum motion. When recruited, both components frequency- and phase-entrained with the primary pendulum mover, wrist ulnar flexion-extension. In experiment 2, subjects swung coupled pendulums in either an in-phase or anti-phase coordinative mode as movement rate increased. Transitions between coordinative modes were not observed. Pattern stability, as defined by the variability of the phase relation between the pendulums, was not affected to any large degree by increasing movement rate. Bifurcations from planar to spherical motion emerged at critical cycling frequencies. Spectral measures demonstrated that this motion was generated by abduction and adduction of the wrist. Elbow flexion-extension motion was also recruited. The newly active components frequency- and phase-entrained with wrist ulnar flexion-extension. When the same neuromuscular components were recruited simultaneously, e.g., elbow motion in both arms, the components exhibited frequency- and phase-entrainment with the task defined pattern. The results demonstrate that recruitment processes stabilize the coordinative modes, thereby reducing the need to switch patterns. Both experiments revealed a much richer dynamics than ever observed in the coupled pendulum paradigm and question the application of one-dimensional phase equation models to the coupled pendulum paradigm.
Title: Flexible modification of biological coordination: The recruitment and suppression of degrees of freedom.
0 views
0 downloads
Name(s): Buchanan, John J.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Kelso, J. A. Scott, Thesis Advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1996
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 220 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The dynamics of recruitment and suppression processes are studied in the coupled pendulum paradigm developed by Kugler and Turvey (1987). Experimentally, the main concern is whether pendulum motion in this task is purely planar. Theoretically, the main concern is whether one-dimensional phase equations developed originally by Haken, Kelso and Bunz (1985) and the symmetry breaking extension by Kelso, Delcolle and Schoner (1990), can capture the richness of the dynamics of this experimental model system. In experiment 1, subjects swung single hand-held pendulums in time with an auditory metronome whose frequency increased. Bifurcations from planar to spherical pendulum motion occurred at critical cycling frequencies. Typically, these frequencies were above the pendulum's eigenfrequency. Spectral measures showed that spherical pendulum motion was generated through the recruitment of wrist abduction and adduction. The spectral measures revealed that elbow flexion and extension was recruited as movement rate increased, presumably to stabilize pendulum motion. When recruited, both components frequency- and phase-entrained with the primary pendulum mover, wrist ulnar flexion-extension. In experiment 2, subjects swung coupled pendulums in either an in-phase or anti-phase coordinative mode as movement rate increased. Transitions between coordinative modes were not observed. Pattern stability, as defined by the variability of the phase relation between the pendulums, was not affected to any large degree by increasing movement rate. Bifurcations from planar to spherical motion emerged at critical cycling frequencies. Spectral measures demonstrated that this motion was generated by abduction and adduction of the wrist. Elbow flexion-extension motion was also recruited. The newly active components frequency- and phase-entrained with wrist ulnar flexion-extension. When the same neuromuscular components were recruited simultaneously, e.g., elbow motion in both arms, the components exhibited frequency- and phase-entrainment with the task defined pattern. The results demonstrate that recruitment processes stabilize the coordinative modes, thereby reducing the need to switch patterns. Both experiments revealed a much richer dynamics than ever observed in the coupled pendulum paradigm and question the application of one-dimensional phase equation models to the coupled pendulum paradigm.
Identifier: 12439 (digitool), FADT12439 (IID), fau:9334 (fedora)
Note(s): Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1996.
Subject(s): Kinesiology
Human mechanics
Movement, Psychology of
Motor learning
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12439
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.