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Study of corrosion-induced failure mechanisms of epoxy-coated reinforcing steel

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Date Issued:
1994
Summary:
A study of the corrosion protection afforded by epoxy coatings on reinforcing steel was performed. To accomplish this bars were acquired from ten sources and coatings were characterized in terms of defects, thickness, solvent extraction weight loss and hardness. Testing involved exposure in various aqueous solutions at both ambient temperature and 80$\sp\circ$C and in chloride-contaminated concrete slabs under outdoor exposure. Direct pull-off adhesion testing was performed on tested and virgin epoxy coated reinforcing steels (ECRs). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) scans were made periodically, and a curve fitting technique was employed to analyze coating parameters. Conventional electrochemical measurements were also made, and corrosion morphology of ECR specimens was examined. It was found that the density and size of coating defects was the primary factor affecting ECR performance. The circuit analysis indicated that poorly performing defect-free coatings absorbed water and oxygen; and these species reached the coating/substrate interface and electrochemical reactions at the interface caused coating degradation. By way of contrast, the impedance response for well-performing ECR specimens showed no signs of active degradation at the interface although diffusional processes similar to those noted for poorly performing bars occurred here also. Experimental results indicated a relationship between corrosion behavior and bar source. Weight loss upon solvent extraction correlated with impedance reduction from hot water exposure. Coating defects developed during most of the tests, especially in high pH solutions containing chloride ions. ECRs with excessive coating defects, either initially present or ones which developed in service, performed poorly in every test category regardless of source. Forms of coating failure were extensive rusting at defects, blistering, wet adhesion loss, cathodic delamination, underfilm corrosion and coating cracks. These occurred sequentially or concurrently, depending on the condition of the ECR and nature of the environment.
Title: Study of corrosion-induced failure mechanisms of epoxy-coated reinforcing steel.
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Name(s): Lee, Seung-Kyoung
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Hartt, William H., Thesis advisor
McIntyre, Jack F., Thesis advisor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1994
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 284 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: A study of the corrosion protection afforded by epoxy coatings on reinforcing steel was performed. To accomplish this bars were acquired from ten sources and coatings were characterized in terms of defects, thickness, solvent extraction weight loss and hardness. Testing involved exposure in various aqueous solutions at both ambient temperature and 80$\sp\circ$C and in chloride-contaminated concrete slabs under outdoor exposure. Direct pull-off adhesion testing was performed on tested and virgin epoxy coated reinforcing steels (ECRs). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) scans were made periodically, and a curve fitting technique was employed to analyze coating parameters. Conventional electrochemical measurements were also made, and corrosion morphology of ECR specimens was examined. It was found that the density and size of coating defects was the primary factor affecting ECR performance. The circuit analysis indicated that poorly performing defect-free coatings absorbed water and oxygen; and these species reached the coating/substrate interface and electrochemical reactions at the interface caused coating degradation. By way of contrast, the impedance response for well-performing ECR specimens showed no signs of active degradation at the interface although diffusional processes similar to those noted for poorly performing bars occurred here also. Experimental results indicated a relationship between corrosion behavior and bar source. Weight loss upon solvent extraction correlated with impedance reduction from hot water exposure. Coating defects developed during most of the tests, especially in high pH solutions containing chloride ions. ECRs with excessive coating defects, either initially present or ones which developed in service, performed poorly in every test category regardless of source. Forms of coating failure were extensive rusting at defects, blistering, wet adhesion loss, cathodic delamination, underfilm corrosion and coating cracks. These occurred sequentially or concurrently, depending on the condition of the ECR and nature of the environment.
Identifier: 12389 (digitool), FADT12389 (IID), fau:9288 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Engineering and Computer Science
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1994.
Subject(s): Corrosion and anti-corrosives
Epoxy coatings
Steel--Corrosion
Concrete--Corrosion
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12389
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.