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The match between the individual and organization: Antecedents and consequences of an ethical fit

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Date Issued:
1993
Summary:
The purpose of this study was to study the relationship between the ethical fit of the employee within the organization and the establishment of employee attitudes and intentions towards the organization. Also of interest was the relationship between the organization and the individual employee's ethical decision making process. Of specific interest were the antecedents and consequences of the interaction between the ethical characteristics of the individual and the ethical climate of the organization. The benefits for both the organization and individual when an ethical fit had been achieved were studied, as were the consequences when an ethical fit did not exist. Research and theory resulting from the study of person-organization fit were reviewed and applied as the basis for the hypotheses proposed in this study. While the study of an ethical organizational fit had not been previously considered, it was proposed that the benefits and consequences from a good or poor ethical fit would be similar to those results reported for person-organization fit in other areas. Respondents (N = 248) were employed full-time, but currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate business degree program. From an organizational perspective, the results indicated that the respondents described their current organizational climate similar to their ideal climate. In addition, the data indicated that when an ethical fit had been achieved, employees were more satisfied, more committed, and less likely to express an intention to turnover than respondents who had not achieved an ethical fit. From an intrapersonal perspective, the results indicated that, when faced with ethical dilemmas, the respondents were less likely to express feelings of discomfort with their personal decision when the organizational expectations for decision making matched the respondents desires. The results also indicated that the respondents were less likely to express feelings of intrapersonal role conflict when faced with ethical dilemmas when the organizational expectations for decision making matched the respondents desires. In addition, organizational expectations for ethical conduct were found to be related to the ethical decision making of the individual.
Title: The match between the individual and organization: Antecedents and consequences of an ethical fit.
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Name(s): Sims, Randi Lenore.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Keon, Thomas L., Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1993
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 233 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this study was to study the relationship between the ethical fit of the employee within the organization and the establishment of employee attitudes and intentions towards the organization. Also of interest was the relationship between the organization and the individual employee's ethical decision making process. Of specific interest were the antecedents and consequences of the interaction between the ethical characteristics of the individual and the ethical climate of the organization. The benefits for both the organization and individual when an ethical fit had been achieved were studied, as were the consequences when an ethical fit did not exist. Research and theory resulting from the study of person-organization fit were reviewed and applied as the basis for the hypotheses proposed in this study. While the study of an ethical organizational fit had not been previously considered, it was proposed that the benefits and consequences from a good or poor ethical fit would be similar to those results reported for person-organization fit in other areas. Respondents (N = 248) were employed full-time, but currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate business degree program. From an organizational perspective, the results indicated that the respondents described their current organizational climate similar to their ideal climate. In addition, the data indicated that when an ethical fit had been achieved, employees were more satisfied, more committed, and less likely to express an intention to turnover than respondents who had not achieved an ethical fit. From an intrapersonal perspective, the results indicated that, when faced with ethical dilemmas, the respondents were less likely to express feelings of discomfort with their personal decision when the organizational expectations for decision making matched the respondents desires. The results also indicated that the respondents were less likely to express feelings of intrapersonal role conflict when faced with ethical dilemmas when the organizational expectations for decision making matched the respondents desires. In addition, organizational expectations for ethical conduct were found to be related to the ethical decision making of the individual.
Identifier: 12351 (digitool), FADT12351 (IID), fau:9253 (fedora)
Note(s): Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1993.
Subject(s): Industrial relations
Business ethics
Organizational sociology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12351
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.