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Counter-rotating slotted ring: A new metropolitan area network architecture

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Date Issued:
1993
Summary:
In this dissertation a new architecture, Counter Rotating Slotted Ring (CRSR), is proposed for Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs). MANs are newly developed optical fiber based networks that have high data transmission rates and wide area coverage. They provide voice, video and data services. A CRSR has a dual-ring architecture that consists of two uni-directional transmission media, which are shared among the network nodes. The transmission time in a CRSR is divided into fixed length slots. These slots are generated by a head station during the system initialization phase. They flow inside the dual-ring in opposite directions: clockwise and counter clockwise. In each slot, there is an Access Control Field, a Segment Header Field and a Segment Payload Field. These fields contain slot control bits, segment identification and data respectively. One of the control bits is used to indicate if a slot has data or not. Once a busy slot, i.e. a slot with data, reaches its destination, it is marked as 'read'. An eraser node is used to identify 'read' slots and erase the data in the slots. In CRSR, there are two possible routes to send data from one node to another. The route with fewer nodes in between is always selected. This Minimum Node Count Routing reduces traffic on the transmission medium. IEEE has issued a Distributed Queue Dual Bus (DQDB) 802.6 standard for the subnetwork of a MAN. Under most circumstances, DQDB performs better than Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), an ANSI MAN standard. However, DQDB has two drawbacks: positional unfairness and poor channel efficiency. A number of solutions have been proposed to solve the unfairness problem, but these approaches do not improve the situation without negative effects on network performance. A CRSR with eraser in all its nodes has two times as much maximum throughput as an equivalent DQDB and at the same time, it is a positionally fair network. Although CRSRs with fewer eraser nodes are unfair, they always outperform equivalent DQDBs both in throughput and fairness.
Title: Counter-rotating slotted ring: A new metropolitan area network architecture.
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Name(s): Choi, Kwok K.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Ilyas, Mohammad, Thesis advisor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1993
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 167 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: In this dissertation a new architecture, Counter Rotating Slotted Ring (CRSR), is proposed for Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs). MANs are newly developed optical fiber based networks that have high data transmission rates and wide area coverage. They provide voice, video and data services. A CRSR has a dual-ring architecture that consists of two uni-directional transmission media, which are shared among the network nodes. The transmission time in a CRSR is divided into fixed length slots. These slots are generated by a head station during the system initialization phase. They flow inside the dual-ring in opposite directions: clockwise and counter clockwise. In each slot, there is an Access Control Field, a Segment Header Field and a Segment Payload Field. These fields contain slot control bits, segment identification and data respectively. One of the control bits is used to indicate if a slot has data or not. Once a busy slot, i.e. a slot with data, reaches its destination, it is marked as 'read'. An eraser node is used to identify 'read' slots and erase the data in the slots. In CRSR, there are two possible routes to send data from one node to another. The route with fewer nodes in between is always selected. This Minimum Node Count Routing reduces traffic on the transmission medium. IEEE has issued a Distributed Queue Dual Bus (DQDB) 802.6 standard for the subnetwork of a MAN. Under most circumstances, DQDB performs better than Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), an ANSI MAN standard. However, DQDB has two drawbacks: positional unfairness and poor channel efficiency. A number of solutions have been proposed to solve the unfairness problem, but these approaches do not improve the situation without negative effects on network performance. A CRSR with eraser in all its nodes has two times as much maximum throughput as an equivalent DQDB and at the same time, it is a positionally fair network. Although CRSRs with fewer eraser nodes are unfair, they always outperform equivalent DQDBs both in throughput and fairness.
Identifier: 12340 (digitool), FADT12340 (IID), fau:9242 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Engineering and Computer Science
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1993.
Subject(s): Metropolitan area networks (Computer networks)
Computer network architectures
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12340
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.