You are here

Sources of information and selected variables and their relationship to teachers' knowledge and attitudes regarding attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2005
Summary:
The purpose of this study was to develop a predictive model for teacher knowledge about ADHD and teacher attitudes toward the disorder. The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Knowledge Assessment (ADHDK.A), developed by the researcher, was used to determine the nature of the relationship between teacher knowledge and attitudes regarding ADHD and various sources from which teachers are most likely to obtain information. Four teacher characteristics (teaching position, experience teaching children with ADHD, personal experience with ADHD, and confidence teaching children with ADHD) were also investigated for their predictive value. The sample was comprised of 225 classroom teachers of grades K to 5 from seven elementary schools in Broward County, Florida. Teachers completed the ADHDKA which consisted of multiple choice, true and false, and open-ended statements about ADHD. Three research questions were posed before data were collected. Multiple regressions were run to determine the degree of association between each of the criterion variables (knowledge and attitude), and the 12 predictor variables investigated in this study. The degree of correlation between teacher knowledge and teacher attitude was examined using a Pearson product moment correlation. Qualitative analysis was used to uncover emerging themes from teacher responses to the open-ended statements. Major findings in the study were as follows: (a) Primary (K- 2) teachers have a higher level of knowledge about ADHD than do intermediate (3-5) teachers (-.159, p < .05); (b) teachers who have personal experience with ADHD have a higher level of knowledge about ADHD than do teachers with no personal experience with ADHD (.147, p < .05); (c) teachers with a high level of confidence about teaching children with ADHD have a higher level of knowledge about ADHD than do teachers with a low level of confidence (.280,p < .01); and (d) a predictive model can be developed to determine teacher knowledge about ADHD (R^2 = .139). The R-square indicates that 13.9% of the variance in teacher knowledge can be accounted for by the variation of the combined predictor variables. Although statistically significant (F [12, 188] = 2.521,p = .004), the correlation is less than the predetermined critical effect size of 25% and may be of limited practical significance (.139 < .25). Conclusions based on the fmdings from the study were: (a) Teachers do not have adequate information regarding strategies to accommodate behavioral and academic challenges for the child with ADHD; (b) teachers lack confidence teaching children with ADHD; and (c) teachers do not receive adequate district-level, or school-based, administrative support (i.e., availability of appropriate ADHD in-service, assistance with parent support, classroom management issues). Noteworthy recommendations for those in positions of educational leadership included the following: (a) more extensive ADHD training for pre-service teachers than is presently required; (b) a comprehensive choice of ADHD workshops offered by school districts to administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, cafeteria staff, custodians, bus drivers, and any other school personnel who may interact with children; and (c) a districtlevel expert on ADHD for the specific purpose of advising administrators, teachers, and parents about practical solutions to everyday ADHD-related issues. Recommendations for future research included the following: (a) Investigate why teachers with high levels of knowledge about ADHD have negative attitudes toward the disorder; (b) employ a mixed between - within design assessing teacher knowledge and attitude before and after attendance at an ADHD in-service; and (c) investigate the connection between teaching position and teacher knowledge about ADHD.
Title: Sources of information and selected variables and their relationship to teachers' knowledge and attitudes regarding attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
159 views
46 downloads
Name(s): Blume-D'Ausilio, Carole, author
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Maslin-Ostrowski, Patricia, Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, FL
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 202 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this study was to develop a predictive model for teacher knowledge about ADHD and teacher attitudes toward the disorder. The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Knowledge Assessment (ADHDK.A), developed by the researcher, was used to determine the nature of the relationship between teacher knowledge and attitudes regarding ADHD and various sources from which teachers are most likely to obtain information. Four teacher characteristics (teaching position, experience teaching children with ADHD, personal experience with ADHD, and confidence teaching children with ADHD) were also investigated for their predictive value. The sample was comprised of 225 classroom teachers of grades K to 5 from seven elementary schools in Broward County, Florida. Teachers completed the ADHDKA which consisted of multiple choice, true and false, and open-ended statements about ADHD. Three research questions were posed before data were collected. Multiple regressions were run to determine the degree of association between each of the criterion variables (knowledge and attitude), and the 12 predictor variables investigated in this study. The degree of correlation between teacher knowledge and teacher attitude was examined using a Pearson product moment correlation. Qualitative analysis was used to uncover emerging themes from teacher responses to the open-ended statements. Major findings in the study were as follows: (a) Primary (K- 2) teachers have a higher level of knowledge about ADHD than do intermediate (3-5) teachers (-.159, p < .05); (b) teachers who have personal experience with ADHD have a higher level of knowledge about ADHD than do teachers with no personal experience with ADHD (.147, p < .05); (c) teachers with a high level of confidence about teaching children with ADHD have a higher level of knowledge about ADHD than do teachers with a low level of confidence (.280,p < .01); and (d) a predictive model can be developed to determine teacher knowledge about ADHD (R^2 = .139). The R-square indicates that 13.9% of the variance in teacher knowledge can be accounted for by the variation of the combined predictor variables. Although statistically significant (F [12, 188] = 2.521,p = .004), the correlation is less than the predetermined critical effect size of 25% and may be of limited practical significance (.139 < .25). Conclusions based on the fmdings from the study were: (a) Teachers do not have adequate information regarding strategies to accommodate behavioral and academic challenges for the child with ADHD; (b) teachers lack confidence teaching children with ADHD; and (c) teachers do not receive adequate district-level, or school-based, administrative support (i.e., availability of appropriate ADHD in-service, assistance with parent support, classroom management issues). Noteworthy recommendations for those in positions of educational leadership included the following: (a) more extensive ADHD training for pre-service teachers than is presently required; (b) a comprehensive choice of ADHD workshops offered by school districts to administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, cafeteria staff, custodians, bus drivers, and any other school personnel who may interact with children; and (c) a districtlevel expert on ADHD for the specific purpose of advising administrators, teachers, and parents about practical solutions to everyday ADHD-related issues. Recommendations for future research included the following: (a) Investigate why teachers with high levels of knowledge about ADHD have negative attitudes toward the disorder; (b) employ a mixed between - within design assessing teacher knowledge and attitude before and after attendance at an ADHD in-service; and (c) investigate the connection between teaching position and teacher knowledge about ADHD.
Identifier: 9780542384660 (isbn), 12179 (digitool), FADT12179 (IID), fau:9086 (fedora)
Degree granted: Thesis (Ed.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2005.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Education
Subject(s): Teacher-student relationships
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Attention-deficit-disordered children--Education
Teachers--Training of
Classroom management
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12179
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.