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Language and leadership: Exploring the relationship between critical theories and the hegemonic construction of student achievement

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Date Issued:
2004
Summary:
This study explored the relationship between critical theories and student achievement. The study applied the principles of Critical Discourse Analysis and Critical Pedagogy in studying the impact of artistic and hegemonic communication on student achievement. The purpose of the study was to critically analyze the language discourse of educational leaders and to determine the extent to which the language discourse contributes to the persistence of the achievement gap and the continuing marginalization of diverse groups of children. This research study offers a practical set of recommendations on how to use the process of critical discourse analysis to arrive at more adequate solutions to the problems that contribute to the achievement gap. It demonstrates how an uncritical acceptance of textual communication from powerful sources such as state departments of education makes educational leaders responsible for the academic failure of children. This study was therefore concerned with finding a process to interrupt hegemonic communication and allow for more democratic use of language that accommodates the multiple realities of the school system. The Research Design used in this research process incorporated data analysis at the state, district and school site levels. The processes of critical discourse analyses were used to scrutinize the language of verbal and written texts and observation data for socio-political relations and ideology embedded in the language. The study found that at the federal, state and district levels hegemonic language was used to assert the worldview of educational accountability and standardization. In contrast to the federal, state and district data, the school site data revealed the use of critical discourse to counteract hegemonic communication and give voice to the multiple realities that exist. This study highlights the fact that educational leaders, including the crafters of educational policies and related documents, skillfully use language to advance their particular perspective. The study demonstrates how educational leaders can implement artistic leadership to open up the spaces in the discourse to interrupt hegemonic communication and eventually close the achievement gap.
Title: Language and leadership: Exploring the relationship between critical theories and the hegemonic construction of student achievement.
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Name(s): McClean, Marva.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Bogotch, Ira, Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 306 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This study explored the relationship between critical theories and student achievement. The study applied the principles of Critical Discourse Analysis and Critical Pedagogy in studying the impact of artistic and hegemonic communication on student achievement. The purpose of the study was to critically analyze the language discourse of educational leaders and to determine the extent to which the language discourse contributes to the persistence of the achievement gap and the continuing marginalization of diverse groups of children. This research study offers a practical set of recommendations on how to use the process of critical discourse analysis to arrive at more adequate solutions to the problems that contribute to the achievement gap. It demonstrates how an uncritical acceptance of textual communication from powerful sources such as state departments of education makes educational leaders responsible for the academic failure of children. This study was therefore concerned with finding a process to interrupt hegemonic communication and allow for more democratic use of language that accommodates the multiple realities of the school system. The Research Design used in this research process incorporated data analysis at the state, district and school site levels. The processes of critical discourse analyses were used to scrutinize the language of verbal and written texts and observation data for socio-political relations and ideology embedded in the language. The study found that at the federal, state and district levels hegemonic language was used to assert the worldview of educational accountability and standardization. In contrast to the federal, state and district data, the school site data revealed the use of critical discourse to counteract hegemonic communication and give voice to the multiple realities that exist. This study highlights the fact that educational leaders, including the crafters of educational policies and related documents, skillfully use language to advance their particular perspective. The study demonstrates how educational leaders can implement artistic leadership to open up the spaces in the discourse to interrupt hegemonic communication and eventually close the achievement gap.
Identifier: 9780496868797 (isbn), 12099 (digitool), FADT12099 (IID), fau:9009 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Thesis (Ed.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2004.
College of Education
Subject(s): Academic achievement
Multicultural education
Curriculum planning--Cross-cultural studies
Education--Research--Methodology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FADT12099
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.