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SHINE: An integrated environment for software hardware co-design

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Date Issued:
2003
Summary:
The rapid evolution of silicon technology has brought exponential benefits in cost, scale of integration, power per function, size per function and speed. The ability to place multiple function "systems" on a single silicon chip, reduce development cycle while increasing product functionality, performance and quality. With this increased complexity, ability to model at high level of abstraction becomes crucial. Also, the fact that no known existing complete system on chip design packages with perfect tools, models, and formalisms further slows down and complicates the development. This dissertation provides an integrated environment for hardware software co-design at a high level of abstraction. We have developed a SystemC based cockpit for this purpose. The cockpit, known as SHINE consists of many components including architectural components, operating system components, and application software components. The ability to represent and manipulate these components at high levels of abstraction is a major challenge. To address these challenges we have developed a set of principles. Important principles evolved are synergy of separation of concerns, reusability, flexibility, ease of use, and support for multiple levels of abstraction. 'Synergy of Separation of Concerns' helps in maintaining transparency during all instances in the development of the integrated environment. One application is transparent to another application and in turn to the system architecture. Also in the system architecture, each module is designed independent of other modules. Well defined interfaces enable this transparency and easier to integrate. This also enhances component reuse and overall design environment modularity. 'Ease of Use' allows the user to shorten the learning curve involved. In SHINE, 'Flexibility' is addressed via support for plug-and-play of components in the design environment. We provide results to show the implementation of these principles. SHINE provides a cost-effective mechanism to develop a system co-design infrastructure. This will lead to early system verification and performance estimation resulting in shorter time-to-market. The design flow developed is structured and is easily extended. This is an exploratory study that is the result of a long term industrial collaboration to enhance design productivity. Significantly more work lies ahead in developing an industry standard tool and methodology.
Title: SHINE: An integrated environment for software hardware co-design.
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Name(s): Jayadevappa, Suryaprasad.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Shankar, Ravi, Thesis advisor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2003
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 149 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The rapid evolution of silicon technology has brought exponential benefits in cost, scale of integration, power per function, size per function and speed. The ability to place multiple function "systems" on a single silicon chip, reduce development cycle while increasing product functionality, performance and quality. With this increased complexity, ability to model at high level of abstraction becomes crucial. Also, the fact that no known existing complete system on chip design packages with perfect tools, models, and formalisms further slows down and complicates the development. This dissertation provides an integrated environment for hardware software co-design at a high level of abstraction. We have developed a SystemC based cockpit for this purpose. The cockpit, known as SHINE consists of many components including architectural components, operating system components, and application software components. The ability to represent and manipulate these components at high levels of abstraction is a major challenge. To address these challenges we have developed a set of principles. Important principles evolved are synergy of separation of concerns, reusability, flexibility, ease of use, and support for multiple levels of abstraction. 'Synergy of Separation of Concerns' helps in maintaining transparency during all instances in the development of the integrated environment. One application is transparent to another application and in turn to the system architecture. Also in the system architecture, each module is designed independent of other modules. Well defined interfaces enable this transparency and easier to integrate. This also enhances component reuse and overall design environment modularity. 'Ease of Use' allows the user to shorten the learning curve involved. In SHINE, 'Flexibility' is addressed via support for plug-and-play of components in the design environment. We provide results to show the implementation of these principles. SHINE provides a cost-effective mechanism to develop a system co-design infrastructure. This will lead to early system verification and performance estimation resulting in shorter time-to-market. The design flow developed is structured and is easily extended. This is an exploratory study that is the result of a long term industrial collaboration to enhance design productivity. Significantly more work lies ahead in developing an industry standard tool and methodology.
Identifier: 9780496581115 (isbn), 12065 (digitool), FADT12065 (IID), fau:8978 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): College of Engineering and Computer Science
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2003.
Subject(s): Computer architecture
System design
Systems software
Multiprocessors
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FADT12065
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.