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comparison of demographics, motivation, and learning strategies of college students taking traditional campus-based courses and Internet-based distance learning courses

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Date Issued:
2003
Summary:
The purpose of this study was to examine some the differences between students in traditional face-to-face courses and those in distance learning courses. Differences in teaming strategies, motivation, and demographics were examined. The study used an online version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) to assess the motivation and learning strategies used by college students. The instrument was administered to 111 students at a 4-year, public university in the southeast region of the United States during the Spring of 2003. The subjects included 64 students enrolled in the traditional campus-based version of Applied Educational Technology and 47 students enrolled in the distance learning version of the same course. The study found significant differences in the demographic characteristics of both groups. Chi-square tests revealed that 6 of the 10 demographic variables (marital status, class level, ethnicity, household income, number of distance learning courses previously taken, and the number of hours per week spent studying for the course) demonstrated statistical significance. Independent samples t tests were used to explore differences in motivation and learning strategies in the two groups. Of the six motivation variables tested (intrinsic goal orientation, task value, control for learning beliefs, self-efficacy, and test anxiety), only two demonstrated statistical significance (p < .01). Distance learning students reported higher levels of intrinsic goal orientation and control for learning beliefs. The study found few differences in the learning strategies reported by the subjects. Of the nine learning strategies tested (rehearsal, help seeking, metacognitive self-regulation, organization, critical thinking, time and study environment, effort regulation, and peer learning), only one demonstrated statistical significance (p <; .01). Students participating in the traditional campus-based course reported higher levels of help seeking behavior than their distance learning peers. A model was developed to predict student choice of distance learning courses using demographic, learning strategies, and motivation variables. Using discriminant analysis, the model correctly classified 75.7% of the cross-validated cases. A second discriminant analysis, using only the variables found to be significant in the t tests and chi-square analysis was also conducted. This model correctly classified 79.3% of the cross-validated groups. As distance learning becomes more prevalent in higher education, it is important to examine the characteristics of students participating in distance education courses. The results of this study indicated that differences existed between the distance learning group and the traditional group. An understanding of those differences may lead to improved design and delivery of distance learning courses.
Title: A comparison of demographics, motivation, and learning strategies of college students taking traditional campus-based courses and Internet-based distance learning courses.
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Name(s): Maupin, Deborah L.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Cafolla, Ray, Thesis advisor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2003
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 131 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this study was to examine some the differences between students in traditional face-to-face courses and those in distance learning courses. Differences in teaming strategies, motivation, and demographics were examined. The study used an online version of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) to assess the motivation and learning strategies used by college students. The instrument was administered to 111 students at a 4-year, public university in the southeast region of the United States during the Spring of 2003. The subjects included 64 students enrolled in the traditional campus-based version of Applied Educational Technology and 47 students enrolled in the distance learning version of the same course. The study found significant differences in the demographic characteristics of both groups. Chi-square tests revealed that 6 of the 10 demographic variables (marital status, class level, ethnicity, household income, number of distance learning courses previously taken, and the number of hours per week spent studying for the course) demonstrated statistical significance. Independent samples t tests were used to explore differences in motivation and learning strategies in the two groups. Of the six motivation variables tested (intrinsic goal orientation, task value, control for learning beliefs, self-efficacy, and test anxiety), only two demonstrated statistical significance (p < .01). Distance learning students reported higher levels of intrinsic goal orientation and control for learning beliefs. The study found few differences in the learning strategies reported by the subjects. Of the nine learning strategies tested (rehearsal, help seeking, metacognitive self-regulation, organization, critical thinking, time and study environment, effort regulation, and peer learning), only one demonstrated statistical significance (p <; .01). Students participating in the traditional campus-based course reported higher levels of help seeking behavior than their distance learning peers. A model was developed to predict student choice of distance learning courses using demographic, learning strategies, and motivation variables. Using discriminant analysis, the model correctly classified 75.7% of the cross-validated cases. A second discriminant analysis, using only the variables found to be significant in the t tests and chi-square analysis was also conducted. This model correctly classified 79.3% of the cross-validated groups. As distance learning becomes more prevalent in higher education, it is important to examine the characteristics of students participating in distance education courses. The results of this study indicated that differences existed between the distance learning group and the traditional group. An understanding of those differences may lead to improved design and delivery of distance learning courses.
Identifier: 9780496568802 (isbn), 12064 (digitool), FADT12064 (IID), fau:8977 (fedora)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Thesis (Ed.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2003.
College of Education
Subject(s): Distance education
Learning strategies
Motivation in education
Internet in higher education
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/12064
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.