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PERCEPTIONS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS AND DEANS IN PALM BEACH COUNTY RELATIVE TO THEIR INVOLVEMENT IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS

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Date Issued:
1981
Summary:
Purpose. This study was designed to examine the perceptions of secondary school assistant principals and deans in Palm Beach County to determine the extent that they perceived their involvement in the decision-making process. Conclusions. It is concluded from the results of these analyses that there are significant differences between the perceptions of assistant principals and deans relative to their involvement in the decision-making process. There are significant differences in their perceptions of the following variables used to measure the perceived extent of involvement in decision making: l) Communication; 2) Motivation; 3) Accountability; 4) Interaction-Influence; and 5) Involvement In Decision Haking. There are no significant differences in their perceptions of the Discrimination variable used to measure the perceived extent of involvement in decision making. It is also concluded from the results of these analyses that there are significant differences between the perceptions of black deans and white deans relative to their involvement in the decision-making process. There are significant differences in their perceptions of the following variables used to measure the perceived extent of involvement in decision making: l) Accountability; 2) Motivation; 3) Communication; and 4) Discrimination. There are no significant differences in their perceptions of the Interaction-Influence and Involvement In Decision Making variables used to measure the extent of involvement in decision making. Additionally, the analyses also indicate significant correlations between the years of administrative experience of assistant principals and deans and their perceptions with regard to their involvement in the decision-making process. There are significant correlations relative to the following variables used to measure the correlations: 1) Involvement In Decision Making: 2) Interaction-Influence; 3) Motivation; and 4) Discrimination. There are no significant correlations relative to the Accountability and Communication variables used to measure the correlations. Finally it is concluded that deans are no less reluctant to assume responsibility in decision making than assistant principals.
Title: THE PERCEPTIONS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS AND DEANS IN PALM BEACH COUNTY RELATIVE TO THEIR INVOLVEMENT IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS.
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Name(s): SMITH, JOSH, JR.
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1981
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 106 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Purpose. This study was designed to examine the perceptions of secondary school assistant principals and deans in Palm Beach County to determine the extent that they perceived their involvement in the decision-making process. Conclusions. It is concluded from the results of these analyses that there are significant differences between the perceptions of assistant principals and deans relative to their involvement in the decision-making process. There are significant differences in their perceptions of the following variables used to measure the perceived extent of involvement in decision making: l) Communication; 2) Motivation; 3) Accountability; 4) Interaction-Influence; and 5) Involvement In Decision Haking. There are no significant differences in their perceptions of the Discrimination variable used to measure the perceived extent of involvement in decision making. It is also concluded from the results of these analyses that there are significant differences between the perceptions of black deans and white deans relative to their involvement in the decision-making process. There are significant differences in their perceptions of the following variables used to measure the perceived extent of involvement in decision making: l) Accountability; 2) Motivation; 3) Communication; and 4) Discrimination. There are no significant differences in their perceptions of the Interaction-Influence and Involvement In Decision Making variables used to measure the extent of involvement in decision making. Additionally, the analyses also indicate significant correlations between the years of administrative experience of assistant principals and deans and their perceptions with regard to their involvement in the decision-making process. There are significant correlations relative to the following variables used to measure the correlations: 1) Involvement In Decision Making: 2) Interaction-Influence; 3) Motivation; and 4) Discrimination. There are no significant correlations relative to the Accountability and Communication variables used to measure the correlations. Finally it is concluded that deans are no less reluctant to assume responsibility in decision making than assistant principals.
Identifier: 11777 (digitool), FADT11777 (IID), fau:8706 (fedora)
Note(s): Thesis (Educat.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1981.
Subject(s): School management and organization--Florida--Decision making
High schools--Administration
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/11777
Sublocation: Digital Library
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.