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FINDING A UNIQUE PATH: EMBODYING PARENTING IN THE MIDST OF CONFLICTING COMPLEXITY WITHIN PEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CARE

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Date Issued:
2020
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the process of complex healthcare decision-making by parents for their children within the milieu of a pediatric palliative care team. As healthcare has advanced, the number of children living with complex chronic conditions has increased. Decision-making by parents for their children referred to palliative care has not, up to this point, been widely explored by nursing. A purposeful sample of 22 participants, parents of children in life-limiting or life-threatening situations were asked: What matters most during the process of complex healthcare decision-making? A constant comparative method was used to analyze data collected from semistructured interviews and the theory of embodying parenting in the midst of conflicting complexity emerged. J. Watson’s (2020) theory of human caring grounded the researcher in living caritas processes throughout the study. All participants experienced a disruption of their expected parenting and family normal. Through constant comparative data analysis, the core category of embodying parenting was identified. Feeling respected as the parent, thoughtfully making right decisions, and maintaining presence support embodying parenting. The basic social process identified was finding a unique path. The process of finding a unique path included connecting with a supportive community, claiming decisional authority, moderating negative thoughts and feelings, and adjusting expectations. Living in peace was achieved by finding a unique path to embodying parenting in the midst of conflicting complexity. For the participants in this study, accepting circumstances, feeling gratitude, and perceiving life differently led to living in peace.
Title: FINDING A UNIQUE PATH: EMBODYING PARENTING IN THE MIDST OF CONFLICTING COMPLEXITY WITHIN PEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CARE.
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Name(s): Olafson, Elizabeth A. , author
Barry, Charlotte D., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 135 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the process of complex healthcare decision-making by parents for their children within the milieu of a pediatric palliative care team. As healthcare has advanced, the number of children living with complex chronic conditions has increased. Decision-making by parents for their children referred to palliative care has not, up to this point, been widely explored by nursing. A purposeful sample of 22 participants, parents of children in life-limiting or life-threatening situations were asked: What matters most during the process of complex healthcare decision-making? A constant comparative method was used to analyze data collected from semistructured interviews and the theory of embodying parenting in the midst of conflicting complexity emerged. J. Watson’s (2020) theory of human caring grounded the researcher in living caritas processes throughout the study. All participants experienced a disruption of their expected parenting and family normal. Through constant comparative data analysis, the core category of embodying parenting was identified. Feeling respected as the parent, thoughtfully making right decisions, and maintaining presence support embodying parenting. The basic social process identified was finding a unique path. The process of finding a unique path included connecting with a supportive community, claiming decisional authority, moderating negative thoughts and feelings, and adjusting expectations. Living in peace was achieved by finding a unique path to embodying parenting in the midst of conflicting complexity. For the participants in this study, accepting circumstances, feeling gratitude, and perceiving life differently led to living in peace.
Identifier: FA00013599 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2020.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Palliative Care
Nursing
Pediatric nursing
Decision Making
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013599
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.