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SORPTIVITY, RESISTIVITY AND POROSITY OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS

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Date Issued:
2020
Abstract/Description:
Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), are beneficial when used as partial replacement of cement in concrete mixtures for coastal concrete structures, blended with Portland cement (binary or ternary mixes), i.e., high-performance concrete provides improved properties when exposed to marine harsh environment. In order to characterize selected durability properties of different concrete mixtures, a testing program was established. The intent of this study consists of testing 10cm diameter x 20cm long concrete specimens prepared with a range of different mix designs. 1) to evaluate the rate of water absorption due to capillary suction, referred to as sorptivity, 2) to evaluate the concrete surface resistivity, 3) to evaluate and compare the total porosity of specimens with different mixes, and 4) to obtain correlations between resistivity and sorptivity. All of these experimental tests were carried out according to ASTM International Standards (Sorptivity, Porosity) and Florida Method of Test (Resistivity). The tests were performed on concrete samples at various ages. Moreover, The results provided a fast and reasonable approximation of the concrete durability over time. Ordinary portland cement was partially replaced with supplementary cementitious materials including: fly ash (20%), silica fume (8%) and blast furnace slag (50%). These SCMs are highly effective in creating more durable concrete design mixtures. The water-to-cementitious (w/cm) ratios of 0.41 and 0.35 were investigated. The concrete that contains pozzolanic materials has demonstrated progress in extending the time for initiation of corrosion. The test results obtained indicate that the concurrent inclusion of fly ash and silica fume greatly reduced water penetration. The mixes containing slag also showed lower porosity and water absorption result, when compared to specimens containing fly ash only. Ternary concrete mixtures specimens showed much higher surface resistivity values than binary mixture specimens. These results suggest that reducing w/cm ratio, adding SCMs to concrete mixtures improved the concrete durability. The possibilities for the risks of corrosion initiation would be minimized (delayed) by prescriptive and then performance-based concrete blends with SCM materials optimized for service exposure in aggressive environments.
Title: SORPTIVITY, RESISTIVITY AND POROSITY OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS.
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Name(s): Barman, Sanjoy, author
Presuel-Moreno, Francisco, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 82 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), are beneficial when used as partial replacement of cement in concrete mixtures for coastal concrete structures, blended with Portland cement (binary or ternary mixes), i.e., high-performance concrete provides improved properties when exposed to marine harsh environment. In order to characterize selected durability properties of different concrete mixtures, a testing program was established. The intent of this study consists of testing 10cm diameter x 20cm long concrete specimens prepared with a range of different mix designs. 1) to evaluate the rate of water absorption due to capillary suction, referred to as sorptivity, 2) to evaluate the concrete surface resistivity, 3) to evaluate and compare the total porosity of specimens with different mixes, and 4) to obtain correlations between resistivity and sorptivity. All of these experimental tests were carried out according to ASTM International Standards (Sorptivity, Porosity) and Florida Method of Test (Resistivity). The tests were performed on concrete samples at various ages. Moreover, The results provided a fast and reasonable approximation of the concrete durability over time. Ordinary portland cement was partially replaced with supplementary cementitious materials including: fly ash (20%), silica fume (8%) and blast furnace slag (50%). These SCMs are highly effective in creating more durable concrete design mixtures. The water-to-cementitious (w/cm) ratios of 0.41 and 0.35 were investigated. The concrete that contains pozzolanic materials has demonstrated progress in extending the time for initiation of corrosion. The test results obtained indicate that the concurrent inclusion of fly ash and silica fume greatly reduced water penetration. The mixes containing slag also showed lower porosity and water absorption result, when compared to specimens containing fly ash only. Ternary concrete mixtures specimens showed much higher surface resistivity values than binary mixture specimens. These results suggest that reducing w/cm ratio, adding SCMs to concrete mixtures improved the concrete durability. The possibilities for the risks of corrosion initiation would be minimized (delayed) by prescriptive and then performance-based concrete blends with SCM materials optimized for service exposure in aggressive environments.
Identifier: FA00013633 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2020.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Fly ash
High performance concrete
Porosity
Silica fume
Slag
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013633
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.