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TOP-DOWN EFFECTS OF PERCEPTUAL GROUPING ON THE PERCEPTION OF MOTION

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Date Issued:
2020
Abstract/Description:
Ullman (1979) has proposed a measurement metric, which he termed “affinity." He described affinity as a certain similarity measure between successively presented surfaces as it affects the perception of apparent motion between the surfaces. Later, the concept of “affinity” has been extended; it entails that how the perception of motion within a surface is affected by its grouping strength with adjacent surfaces (Hock and Nichols, 2012). It has been found that the more attributes, that are shared by the adjacent surfaces, the greater the likelihood of their being grouped together. However, Ullman (1979) suggested that the relative affinities of pairs of surfaces could determine the solutions for the motion correspondence problem (when more than one motion path is possible). However, it has remained unknown whether the effects of affinity on solutions to the correspondence problem are due to its effects on a single surface apparent motion strength or pre-selection biases; i.e., the top-down effects of perceptual grouping favoring the perception of motion in one direction as opposed to other competing directions. In the current study, it has been confirmed that motion within a surface is affected by its affinity with adjacent surfaces. The current study also confirmed that affinity has a small, but significant effect on motion strength when motion surfaces are presented in a single surface apparent motion configuration, evidence for top-down effects in which motion strength can be affected by affinity. In motion correspondence problem, affinity affects the perceived motion direction due to competition is consistent with the solution to the motion correspondence problem being affected by the relative affinity-determined strength of competing motion signals. But it is seen that there is strong affinity is due to preselection identity biases. To conclude, in motion correspondence problem, stronger motion is perceived between the two similar surfaces is due to pre-selection biases resulting from the perceptual grouping of surfaces with the greatest affinity; i.e., the top-down effects favoring the perception of motion in one direction as opposed to other competing directions.
Title: TOP-DOWN EFFECTS OF PERCEPTUAL GROUPING ON THE PERCEPTION OF MOTION.
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Name(s): Datta, Debarshi, author
Hock, Howard S. , Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Psychology
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: online resource
Extent: 87 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Ullman (1979) has proposed a measurement metric, which he termed “affinity." He described affinity as a certain similarity measure between successively presented surfaces as it affects the perception of apparent motion between the surfaces. Later, the concept of “affinity” has been extended; it entails that how the perception of motion within a surface is affected by its grouping strength with adjacent surfaces (Hock and Nichols, 2012). It has been found that the more attributes, that are shared by the adjacent surfaces, the greater the likelihood of their being grouped together. However, Ullman (1979) suggested that the relative affinities of pairs of surfaces could determine the solutions for the motion correspondence problem (when more than one motion path is possible). However, it has remained unknown whether the effects of affinity on solutions to the correspondence problem are due to its effects on a single surface apparent motion strength or pre-selection biases; i.e., the top-down effects of perceptual grouping favoring the perception of motion in one direction as opposed to other competing directions. In the current study, it has been confirmed that motion within a surface is affected by its affinity with adjacent surfaces. The current study also confirmed that affinity has a small, but significant effect on motion strength when motion surfaces are presented in a single surface apparent motion configuration, evidence for top-down effects in which motion strength can be affected by affinity. In motion correspondence problem, affinity affects the perceived motion direction due to competition is consistent with the solution to the motion correspondence problem being affected by the relative affinity-determined strength of competing motion signals. But it is seen that there is strong affinity is due to preselection identity biases. To conclude, in motion correspondence problem, stronger motion is perceived between the two similar surfaces is due to pre-selection biases resulting from the perceptual grouping of surfaces with the greatest affinity; i.e., the top-down effects favoring the perception of motion in one direction as opposed to other competing directions.
Identifier: FA00013567 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2020.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Motion Perception
Perceptual grouping
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013567
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.