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BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY OF CERCOPITHECUS LOMAMIENSIS IN THE LOMAMI NATIONAL PARK AND BUFFER ZONE, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

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Date Issued:
2020
Abstract/Description:
In 2012, a new monkey species, Cercopithecus lomamiensis (lesula), was discovered in the Central Congo basin. Lesula is a semi-terrestrial rainforest guenon endemic to the area. Using a systematic grid approach, three terrestrial camera trap surveys (two inside the Lomami National Park; one in the buffer zone) were conducted over three years to capture the cryptic species. The objectives of my study were to expand knowledge on the behavioral ecology of lesula and evaluate lesula’s sensitivity to hunting threats. The main findings from my study included: confirmation of terrestriality and diurnality, births clustering during the wet season, social group living of one male and multiple females, and high impact of hunting on group size. By studying the latest added species to the Cercopithecini tribe, my thesis helps to better understand the ecological diversity occurring within this radiation of African primates and contributes to the species’ long-term conservation efforts.
Title: BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY OF CERCOPITHECUS LOMAMIENSIS IN THE LOMAMI NATIONAL PARK AND BUFFER ZONE, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO.
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Name(s): Korchia, Charlene S. Fournier, author
Detwiler, Kate M., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Biological Sciences
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 63 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In 2012, a new monkey species, Cercopithecus lomamiensis (lesula), was discovered in the Central Congo basin. Lesula is a semi-terrestrial rainforest guenon endemic to the area. Using a systematic grid approach, three terrestrial camera trap surveys (two inside the Lomami National Park; one in the buffer zone) were conducted over three years to capture the cryptic species. The objectives of my study were to expand knowledge on the behavioral ecology of lesula and evaluate lesula’s sensitivity to hunting threats. The main findings from my study included: confirmation of terrestriality and diurnality, births clustering during the wet season, social group living of one male and multiple females, and high impact of hunting on group size. By studying the latest added species to the Cercopithecini tribe, my thesis helps to better understand the ecological diversity occurring within this radiation of African primates and contributes to the species’ long-term conservation efforts.
Identifier: FA00013479 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2020.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Cercopithecus lomamiensis
Cercopithecus--Behavior--Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Behavioral ecology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013479
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.