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SYNTHETIC FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE PERFORMANCE AFTER PROLONGED ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE UTILIZING THE MODIFIED INDIRECT TENSILE TEST

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Date Issued:
2020
Abstract/Description:
In order to study the mechanical performance of dry-cast synthetic fiber reinforced concrete (SynFRC), samples of varying geometry, fiber content, and environmental exposure were developed and tested using the modified indirect tensile test. The samples created consisted of three different thicknesses (with two different geometries), and six different fiber contents that differed in either type, or quantity, of fibers. Throughout the duration of this research, procedures for inflicting detrimental materials into the concrete samples were employed at a number of different environments by implementing accelerated rates of deterioration using geometric adjustments, increased temperature exposure, wetting/drying cycles, and preparation techniques. The SynFRC samples studied were immersed in a wide range of environments including: the exposure of samples to high humidity and calcium hydroxide environments, which served at the control group, while the sea water, low pH, and barge conditioning environments were used to depict the real world environments similar to what would be experienced in the Florida ecosystem. As a result of this conditioning regime, the concrete was able to imitate the real-world effects that the environments would have inflicted if exposed for long durations after an exposure period of only 20-24 months. Having adequately conditioned the samples in their respective environments, they were then tested (and forensically investigated) using the modified indirect tensile testing method to gather data regarding each sample’s toughness and load handling capability. By analyzing the results from each sample, the toughness was calculated by taking the area under the force displacement curve. From these toughness readings it was found that possible degradation occurred between the fiber-matrix interface of some of the concrete samples conditioned in the Barge environment. From these specimens that were immersed in the barge environment, a handful of them exhibited multiple episodes of strain softening characteristics within their force displacement curves. In regard to the fibers used within the samples, the PVA fibers tended to pull off more while the Tuff Strand SF fibers had the highest tendency to break (despite some of the fibers showing similar pull off and breaking failure characteristics). When it comes to the overall thickness of the sample, there was clear correlation between the increase in size and the increase in sample toughness, however the degree to which it correlates varies from sample to sample.
Title: SYNTHETIC FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE PERFORMANCE AFTER PROLONGED ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE UTILIZING THE MODIFIED INDIRECT TENSILE TEST.
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Name(s): Ellis, Spencer G. , author
Presuel-Moreno, Francisco , Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 125 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In order to study the mechanical performance of dry-cast synthetic fiber reinforced concrete (SynFRC), samples of varying geometry, fiber content, and environmental exposure were developed and tested using the modified indirect tensile test. The samples created consisted of three different thicknesses (with two different geometries), and six different fiber contents that differed in either type, or quantity, of fibers. Throughout the duration of this research, procedures for inflicting detrimental materials into the concrete samples were employed at a number of different environments by implementing accelerated rates of deterioration using geometric adjustments, increased temperature exposure, wetting/drying cycles, and preparation techniques. The SynFRC samples studied were immersed in a wide range of environments including: the exposure of samples to high humidity and calcium hydroxide environments, which served at the control group, while the sea water, low pH, and barge conditioning environments were used to depict the real world environments similar to what would be experienced in the Florida ecosystem. As a result of this conditioning regime, the concrete was able to imitate the real-world effects that the environments would have inflicted if exposed for long durations after an exposure period of only 20-24 months. Having adequately conditioned the samples in their respective environments, they were then tested (and forensically investigated) using the modified indirect tensile testing method to gather data regarding each sample’s toughness and load handling capability. By analyzing the results from each sample, the toughness was calculated by taking the area under the force displacement curve. From these toughness readings it was found that possible degradation occurred between the fiber-matrix interface of some of the concrete samples conditioned in the Barge environment. From these specimens that were immersed in the barge environment, a handful of them exhibited multiple episodes of strain softening characteristics within their force displacement curves. In regard to the fibers used within the samples, the PVA fibers tended to pull off more while the Tuff Strand SF fibers had the highest tendency to break (despite some of the fibers showing similar pull off and breaking failure characteristics). When it comes to the overall thickness of the sample, there was clear correlation between the increase in size and the increase in sample toughness, however the degree to which it correlates varies from sample to sample.
Identifier: FA00013466 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2020.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Reinforced concrete
Fiber-reinforced concrete--Testing
Reinforced concrete--Mechanical properties
Tensile Strength
Concrete—Environmental testing
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013466
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.