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Stroke Prevention in a Neighborhood with a High Incidence of Stroke: Exploring a Community’s Understanding

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Stroke continues to plague the United States, affecting 795,000 people annually. Although stroke mortality has decreased, the overall incidence of stroke appears essentially unchanged. With a population that is projected to increase in age and stroke risk over the next 10-15 years, this is concerning. Current stroke prevention education may not be adequately tailored to community learning needs. Analyzing existing demographic data within electronic medical records may allow healthcare systems to identify high-risk neighborhoods by geocoding stroke diagnoses and then completing a qualitative analysis within the target community of specific stroke knowledge deficits. That information may then inform stroke prevention education for that neighborhood. A descriptive, exploratory approach was used to identify a community with a high incidence of stroke using geocoded demographic data from patients coding out with a stroke diagnosis. Qualitative interviews conducted within the community yielded the following themes: fragmented knowledge of stroke causes and risk factors, unawareness of hypertension and diabetes as significant risk factors for stroke, knowing but experiencing challenges to engaging in healthy practices—specifically, diet and exercise, and financial barriers to healthcare resources. While most of the participants had adequate healthcare coverage and reported regular interactions with a primary healthcare provider, this community continued to experience a higher incidence of stroke than surrounding neighborhoods. The findings of this study highlighted specific challenges to stroke prevention that may inform future stroke prevention initiatives. Future research in other communities using this approach may provide additional insights into the specific knowledge deficits unique to communities, as well as revealing patterns and trends in stroke prevention knowledge. Approaching stroke prevention education using only data obtained from large registries may provide a broad overview of knowledge deficits, but lack the specificity necessary to effectively address stroke knowledge needs at the community level. Recognizing the challenges inherent with behavior modification for implementing lifestyle changes should also be considered when designing future stroke education. Harnessing technology in the form of web applications, text messaging, and email for maintaining communication with patients may improve effectiveness of stroke prevention interventions. Implementing a comprehensive health promotion program that addresses specific community needs with tailored health education and behavioral support may lead to decreased incidence of cerebrovascular disease in this community and provide a model for managing other preventable diseases.
Title: Stroke Prevention in a Neighborhood with a High Incidence of Stroke: Exploring a Community’s Understanding.
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Name(s): Sessa, Joy, author
Keller, Kathryn, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2019
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 95 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Stroke continues to plague the United States, affecting 795,000 people annually. Although stroke mortality has decreased, the overall incidence of stroke appears essentially unchanged. With a population that is projected to increase in age and stroke risk over the next 10-15 years, this is concerning. Current stroke prevention education may not be adequately tailored to community learning needs. Analyzing existing demographic data within electronic medical records may allow healthcare systems to identify high-risk neighborhoods by geocoding stroke diagnoses and then completing a qualitative analysis within the target community of specific stroke knowledge deficits. That information may then inform stroke prevention education for that neighborhood. A descriptive, exploratory approach was used to identify a community with a high incidence of stroke using geocoded demographic data from patients coding out with a stroke diagnosis. Qualitative interviews conducted within the community yielded the following themes: fragmented knowledge of stroke causes and risk factors, unawareness of hypertension and diabetes as significant risk factors for stroke, knowing but experiencing challenges to engaging in healthy practices—specifically, diet and exercise, and financial barriers to healthcare resources. While most of the participants had adequate healthcare coverage and reported regular interactions with a primary healthcare provider, this community continued to experience a higher incidence of stroke than surrounding neighborhoods. The findings of this study highlighted specific challenges to stroke prevention that may inform future stroke prevention initiatives. Future research in other communities using this approach may provide additional insights into the specific knowledge deficits unique to communities, as well as revealing patterns and trends in stroke prevention knowledge. Approaching stroke prevention education using only data obtained from large registries may provide a broad overview of knowledge deficits, but lack the specificity necessary to effectively address stroke knowledge needs at the community level. Recognizing the challenges inherent with behavior modification for implementing lifestyle changes should also be considered when designing future stroke education. Harnessing technology in the form of web applications, text messaging, and email for maintaining communication with patients may improve effectiveness of stroke prevention interventions. Implementing a comprehensive health promotion program that addresses specific community needs with tailored health education and behavioral support may lead to decreased incidence of cerebrovascular disease in this community and provide a model for managing other preventable diseases.
Identifier: FA00013261 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2019.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Stroke prevention & control
Patient Education--methods
Commnunity
Neighborhoods
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013261
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.