You are here

relationship between parental lifestyles, attachment style and the mediating effect of family environment on the characteristics of their adult chldren in substance abuse treatment

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
The role of attachment style in overall family functioning and in individual substance abuse patterns has been researched extensively. Lifestyle constructs have been seen as predictors of substance abuse related behaviors, including future drug related difficulties. Dysfunctional family environments have been seen as predictors of poor mental health outcomes in family members. Despite the high rates of co-morbidity in alcohol and drug dependent individuals, parental lifestyle, attachment style, and the overall influence of family environment on the psychological traits of substance dependent individuals had not been previously examined. This study examined a group of parents and their adult children (actively in substance abuse treatment, with diagnoses of substance dependence) who participated in a weeklong family education program at an inpatient treatment center. Direct effects were found between attachment style, lifestyle and patient traits, as well as several significant total effects (combined direct effect and the effect of overall family environment). Specific indirect effects were also found from individual family environment mediators, including moral religious emphasis and control, on the relationship between independent and dependent variables. An analysis of the results is given, along with a discussion of clinical implications and directions for future research.
Title: The relationship between parental lifestyles, attachment style and the mediating effect of family environment on the characteristics of their adult chldren in substance abuse treatment.
435 views
319 downloads
Name(s): McIlveen, John W.
College of Education
Department of Counselor Education
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xiv, 133 p. : ill.
Language(s): English
Summary: The role of attachment style in overall family functioning and in individual substance abuse patterns has been researched extensively. Lifestyle constructs have been seen as predictors of substance abuse related behaviors, including future drug related difficulties. Dysfunctional family environments have been seen as predictors of poor mental health outcomes in family members. Despite the high rates of co-morbidity in alcohol and drug dependent individuals, parental lifestyle, attachment style, and the overall influence of family environment on the psychological traits of substance dependent individuals had not been previously examined. This study examined a group of parents and their adult children (actively in substance abuse treatment, with diagnoses of substance dependence) who participated in a weeklong family education program at an inpatient treatment center. Direct effects were found between attachment style, lifestyle and patient traits, as well as several significant total effects (combined direct effect and the effect of overall family environment). Specific indirect effects were also found from individual family environment mediators, including moral religious emphasis and control, on the relationship between independent and dependent variables. An analysis of the results is given, along with a discussion of clinical implications and directions for future research.
Identifier: 851760106 (oclc), 3360963 (digitool), FADT3360963 (IID), fau:4127 (fedora)
Note(s): by John W. McIlveen.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2013.
Includes bibliography.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Reader.
Subject(s): Parent and child
Substance abuse -- Treatment
Family psychotherapy
Addicts -- Rehabilitation
Chemical health psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/dt/3360963
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU