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Information Technology Induced Attentional Switching Effects on Inhibitory Control

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Deciding what information we attend to has implications on our ability to remain valuable and productive in our respective academic and economic domains. This study investigated if attentional switching due to information technology interruptions would deplete resources in a unique way and impair performance on a response inhibition task. Three groups were compared on the Simon task after participants either did or did not receive interruptions during a self-regulation task. Unexpectedly, a larger Simon effect was found for participants who did not receive interruptions. These results conform to previous evidence showing sustained directed attention may result in depletion and effect subsequent inhibitory control. Although not supporting predictions, these results may provide a basis for further research, particularly because younger generations are developing in a more connected world than preceding generations. By understanding these differences, younger generations may better adapt to technological advances and leverage them to their advantage.
Title: Information Technology Induced Attentional Switching Effects on Inhibitory Control.
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Name(s): Christopher, Deven M., author
Rosselli, Monica, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Psychology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2018
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 50 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Deciding what information we attend to has implications on our ability to remain valuable and productive in our respective academic and economic domains. This study investigated if attentional switching due to information technology interruptions would deplete resources in a unique way and impair performance on a response inhibition task. Three groups were compared on the Simon task after participants either did or did not receive interruptions during a self-regulation task. Unexpectedly, a larger Simon effect was found for participants who did not receive interruptions. These results conform to previous evidence showing sustained directed attention may result in depletion and effect subsequent inhibitory control. Although not supporting predictions, these results may provide a basis for further research, particularly because younger generations are developing in a more connected world than preceding generations. By understanding these differences, younger generations may better adapt to technological advances and leverage them to their advantage.
Identifier: FA00013117 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2018.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Attention
Interruptions
Information technology
Inhibition
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013117
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.