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Bioinformatic analysis of viral genomic sequences and concepts of genome-specific national vaccine design

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Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
This research is concerned with analyzing a set of viral genomes to elucidate the underlying characteristics and determine the information-theoretic aspects of the genomic signatures. The goal of this study thereof, is tailored to address the following: (i) Reviewing various methods available to deduce the features and characteristics of genomic sequences of organisms in general, and particularly focusing on the genomes pertinent to viruses; (ii) applying the concepts of information-theoretics (entropy principles) to analyze genomic sequences; (iii) envisaging various aspects of biothermodynamic energetics so as to determine the framework and architecture that decide the stability and patterns of the subsequences in a genome; (iv) evaluating the genomic details using spectral-domain techniques; (v) studying fuzzy considerations to ascertain the overlapping details in genomic sequences; (vi) determining the common subsequences among various strains of a virus by logistically regressing the data obtained via entropic, energetics and spectral-domain exercises; (vii) differentiating informational profiles of coding and non-coding regions in a DNA sequence to locate aberrant (cryptic) attributes evolved as a result of mutational changes and (viii) finding the signatures of CDS of genomes of viral strains toward rationally conceiving plausible designs of vaccines. Commensurate with the topics indicated above, necessary simulations are proposed and computational exercises are performed (with MatLabTM R2009b and other software as needed). Extensive data gathered from open-literature are used thereof and, simulation results are verified. Lastly, results are discussed, inferences are made and open-questions are identified for future research.
Title: Bioinformatic analysis of viral genomic sequences and concepts of genome-specific national vaccine design.
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Name(s): Chatterjee, Sharmistha P.
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xiii, 206 p. : ill. (some col.)
Language(s): English
Summary: This research is concerned with analyzing a set of viral genomes to elucidate the underlying characteristics and determine the information-theoretic aspects of the genomic signatures. The goal of this study thereof, is tailored to address the following: (i) Reviewing various methods available to deduce the features and characteristics of genomic sequences of organisms in general, and particularly focusing on the genomes pertinent to viruses; (ii) applying the concepts of information-theoretics (entropy principles) to analyze genomic sequences; (iii) envisaging various aspects of biothermodynamic energetics so as to determine the framework and architecture that decide the stability and patterns of the subsequences in a genome; (iv) evaluating the genomic details using spectral-domain techniques; (v) studying fuzzy considerations to ascertain the overlapping details in genomic sequences; (vi) determining the common subsequences among various strains of a virus by logistically regressing the data obtained via entropic, energetics and spectral-domain exercises; (vii) differentiating informational profiles of coding and non-coding regions in a DNA sequence to locate aberrant (cryptic) attributes evolved as a result of mutational changes and (viii) finding the signatures of CDS of genomes of viral strains toward rationally conceiving plausible designs of vaccines. Commensurate with the topics indicated above, necessary simulations are proposed and computational exercises are performed (with MatLabTM R2009b and other software as needed). Extensive data gathered from open-literature are used thereof and, simulation results are verified. Lastly, results are discussed, inferences are made and open-questions are identified for future research.
Identifier: 849650332 (oclc), 3360772 (digitool), FADT3360772 (IID), fau:4089 (fedora)
Note(s): by Sharmistha P. Chatterjee.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2013.
Includes bibliography.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Reader.
Subject(s): Genetic engineering
Bioinformatics
Genomics
DNA microarrays
Proteomics
Held by: FBoU FAUER
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/3360772
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU