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Should Chivalry Be Dead? Benevolent Sexism and Support Provision in Close Relationships

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Three studies examined the effects of benevolent sexism and gender on support provision and relationship functioning across multiple contexts. Benevolent sexism refers to sexist attitudes towards women that are seemingly positive, but still stereotypical (Glick & Fiske, 1996). Study 1 examined benevolent sexism and dependency-oriented support in friendships by asking participants how they would respond to either a female or male acquaintance in hypothetical helping scenarios. Study 2 examined benevolent sexism and secure base support among individuals in heterosexual romantic relationships using an Internet-based survey. Secure base support differs from other forms of support in that it is not provided in order to help someone cope with adversity, but rather involves supporting a partner’s exploration or personal goal pursuit in non-adverse scenarios. Study 3 used behavioral observation to examine benevolent sexism and secure base support among romantic couples participating in a videotaped exploration task. Multiple regression and dyadic analyses were conducted to test for interactions between gender, benevolent sexism, and support provision. In both men and women in Study 1, benevolent sexism was associated with an increased likelihood of providing dependencyoriented help towards others, suggesting that men are not the only ones providing dependency-oriented support to women. However, men were more likely than women to provide dependency-oriented help towards women, regardless of their degree of benevolent sexism. In Studies 2 and 3, there were no significant main effects of benevolent sexism or gender on secure base support. In Study 2, women higher in benevolent sexism reported being more interfering towards their male partner’s goal pursuit, suggesting that benevolent sexism may be harmful to men as well. In Study 3, women reported lower feelings of competence during the exploration task than men. For individuals with partners high in benevolent sexism, gender moderated their feelings of competence. Women with male partners high in benevolent sexism reported lower feelings of competence, whereas men with female partners high in benevolent sexism reported higher feelings of competence. The mixed results suggest that the effects of benevolent sexism on support exchanges may be more complex than current theoretical perspectives imply.
Title: Should Chivalry Be Dead? Benevolent Sexism and Support Provision in Close Relationships.
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Name(s): Colom Cruz, Adriana, author
Maniaci, Michael, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Psychology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2018
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 83 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Three studies examined the effects of benevolent sexism and gender on support provision and relationship functioning across multiple contexts. Benevolent sexism refers to sexist attitudes towards women that are seemingly positive, but still stereotypical (Glick & Fiske, 1996). Study 1 examined benevolent sexism and dependency-oriented support in friendships by asking participants how they would respond to either a female or male acquaintance in hypothetical helping scenarios. Study 2 examined benevolent sexism and secure base support among individuals in heterosexual romantic relationships using an Internet-based survey. Secure base support differs from other forms of support in that it is not provided in order to help someone cope with adversity, but rather involves supporting a partner’s exploration or personal goal pursuit in non-adverse scenarios. Study 3 used behavioral observation to examine benevolent sexism and secure base support among romantic couples participating in a videotaped exploration task. Multiple regression and dyadic analyses were conducted to test for interactions between gender, benevolent sexism, and support provision. In both men and women in Study 1, benevolent sexism was associated with an increased likelihood of providing dependencyoriented help towards others, suggesting that men are not the only ones providing dependency-oriented support to women. However, men were more likely than women to provide dependency-oriented help towards women, regardless of their degree of benevolent sexism. In Studies 2 and 3, there were no significant main effects of benevolent sexism or gender on secure base support. In Study 2, women higher in benevolent sexism reported being more interfering towards their male partner’s goal pursuit, suggesting that benevolent sexism may be harmful to men as well. In Study 3, women reported lower feelings of competence during the exploration task than men. For individuals with partners high in benevolent sexism, gender moderated their feelings of competence. Women with male partners high in benevolent sexism reported lower feelings of competence, whereas men with female partners high in benevolent sexism reported higher feelings of competence. The mixed results suggest that the effects of benevolent sexism on support exchanges may be more complex than current theoretical perspectives imply.
Identifier: FA00005965 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2018.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Chivalry
Sexism
Dependency
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00005965
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.