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Entitlement in the Workplace

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
The present research investigates entitlement in the workplace through three related papers—a review and two empirical studies. In the first paper, I conduct a review of entitlement and offer an agenda for future research. I examine entitlement’s various historical roots, definitions and conceptualizations, measures, theoretical frameworks, antecedents, consequences, and role as a moderator. I also outline avenues for future entitlement research and advocate for research that considers the effects of perceived coworker entitlement from a state perspective. Following the research agenda of paper one, I empirically delve into the negative effects of perceived coworker entitlement in the second two papers. Specifically, in the second paper I explore how the individual can mitigate the negative effects associated with perceived coworker entitlement and in the third paper I explore how the organization can mitigate the negative effects associated with perceived coworker entitlement. In the second paper, I utilize equity theory and referent cognitions theory to examine the relationships between perceived coworker entitlement and individual outcomes including in-role behavior, organizational citizenship behavior, pay satisfaction, and counterproductive work behavior via psychological distress. I further explore the moderating role of individual difference variables including core-self evaluations, positive and negative affect, and equity sensitivity in the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and psychological distress. Using a sample of 200 working adults, I found that core self-evaluations and equity sensitivity significantly moderate the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and psychological distress. However, I did not find any significant mediation or moderated mediation relationships. In the third paper, I utilize fairness theory as a theoretical framework to study the relationships among perceived coworker entitlement, job satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior, and emotional exhaustion. I further explore the moderating role of Colquitt’s (2001) four dimensions of organizational justice: distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Using the same sample of 200 working adults, I found that perceived coworker entitlement is negatively related to organizational citizenship behavior; distributive justice moderates the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and emotional exhaustion; interpersonal justice moderates the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion; and informational justice moderates the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and emotional exhaustion. Contributions to research, practical implications, strengths and limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.
Title: Entitlement in the Workplace.
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Name(s): Brant, Katarina K., author
Castro, Stephanie L., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Business
Department of Management
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2018
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 247 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The present research investigates entitlement in the workplace through three related papers—a review and two empirical studies. In the first paper, I conduct a review of entitlement and offer an agenda for future research. I examine entitlement’s various historical roots, definitions and conceptualizations, measures, theoretical frameworks, antecedents, consequences, and role as a moderator. I also outline avenues for future entitlement research and advocate for research that considers the effects of perceived coworker entitlement from a state perspective. Following the research agenda of paper one, I empirically delve into the negative effects of perceived coworker entitlement in the second two papers. Specifically, in the second paper I explore how the individual can mitigate the negative effects associated with perceived coworker entitlement and in the third paper I explore how the organization can mitigate the negative effects associated with perceived coworker entitlement. In the second paper, I utilize equity theory and referent cognitions theory to examine the relationships between perceived coworker entitlement and individual outcomes including in-role behavior, organizational citizenship behavior, pay satisfaction, and counterproductive work behavior via psychological distress. I further explore the moderating role of individual difference variables including core-self evaluations, positive and negative affect, and equity sensitivity in the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and psychological distress. Using a sample of 200 working adults, I found that core self-evaluations and equity sensitivity significantly moderate the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and psychological distress. However, I did not find any significant mediation or moderated mediation relationships. In the third paper, I utilize fairness theory as a theoretical framework to study the relationships among perceived coworker entitlement, job satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior, and emotional exhaustion. I further explore the moderating role of Colquitt’s (2001) four dimensions of organizational justice: distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Using the same sample of 200 working adults, I found that perceived coworker entitlement is negatively related to organizational citizenship behavior; distributive justice moderates the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and emotional exhaustion; interpersonal justice moderates the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion; and informational justice moderates the relationship between perceived coworker entitlement and emotional exhaustion. Contributions to research, practical implications, strengths and limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.
Identifier: FA00013043 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2018.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Entitlement attitudes
Workplace
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00013043
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Owner Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.