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impact of reputation orientation on marketing strategy formation and performance

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Date Issued:
2011
Summary:
This research explores the attitudes held by marketing managers about building their company's corporate reputation, and about the impact of their actions on performance. In an environment of costly brand building, declining customer loyalty, and increasing scrutiny from stakeholders who demand corporate responsibility and transparency, a concern for corporate reputation is increasingly important for everyone in the company, including marketing managers. The marketing literature, however, has not explored how managers who are concerned about the reputation of their companies can effectively adapt marketing strategy for reputation enhancement. The theoretical justification for this research is grounded in stakeholder theory, dynamic capabilities theory, and strategic choice theory. The study contributes to the marketing strategy literature and the nascent field of stakeholder marketing. It makes a theoretical connection between the corporate-level construct of reputation orientation, and its impact on functional-level decisions about marketing strategy. Reputation orientation is the concern that top management and employees share about their company's commitment to nurturing a positive corporate reputation among key stakeholders. A scale for reputation was conceptually defined and empirically tested (Churchill, 1979). It consists of three dimensions: consciously created corporate identity, internal identity dissemination, and external stakeholder impact. Reputation orientation was found to be a valid and reliable construct that was further tested within the framework of how marketing managers formulate, implement, and evaluate their strategic marketing decisions. This research also tested the impact of stakeholder-conscious marketing strategy on corporate reputation and marketing performance.
Title: The impact of reputation orientation on marketing strategy formation and performance.
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Name(s): Goldring, Deborah
College of Business
Department of Marketing
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Issuance: multipart monograph
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xi, 191 p. : ill.
Language(s): English
Summary: This research explores the attitudes held by marketing managers about building their company's corporate reputation, and about the impact of their actions on performance. In an environment of costly brand building, declining customer loyalty, and increasing scrutiny from stakeholders who demand corporate responsibility and transparency, a concern for corporate reputation is increasingly important for everyone in the company, including marketing managers. The marketing literature, however, has not explored how managers who are concerned about the reputation of their companies can effectively adapt marketing strategy for reputation enhancement. The theoretical justification for this research is grounded in stakeholder theory, dynamic capabilities theory, and strategic choice theory. The study contributes to the marketing strategy literature and the nascent field of stakeholder marketing. It makes a theoretical connection between the corporate-level construct of reputation orientation, and its impact on functional-level decisions about marketing strategy. Reputation orientation is the concern that top management and employees share about their company's commitment to nurturing a positive corporate reputation among key stakeholders. A scale for reputation was conceptually defined and empirically tested (Churchill, 1979). It consists of three dimensions: consciously created corporate identity, internal identity dissemination, and external stakeholder impact. Reputation orientation was found to be a valid and reliable construct that was further tested within the framework of how marketing managers formulate, implement, and evaluate their strategic marketing decisions. This research also tested the impact of stakeholder-conscious marketing strategy on corporate reputation and marketing performance.
Summary: The results from the empirical research indicate that organizations with a reputation orientation devise and select marketing strategies that focus on the needs and concerns of customers and other key stakeholders. Reputation orientation guides a stakeholder-conscious marketing strategy, such that marketing strategy decisions take into consideration both the impacts on corporate reputation and marketing performance without sacrificing either. The implications for marketing practice is that marketing managers can deliberately choose marketing strategies that build a strong corporate reputation by considering the concerns of customers and other key stakeholders at the earliest stages of marketing strategy formulation.
Identifier: 773711930 (oclc), 3357426 (digitool), FADT3357426 (IID), fau:4001 (fedora)
Note(s): by Deborah Goldring.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2011.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2011. Mode of access: World Wide Web. FboU
Subject(s): Communication in marketing
Communication in organizations
Corporate image -- Management
Business communication
Corporate governance
Industrial management
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/3357426
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU