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Mobile Modernity: Transportation in the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
A central paradox in modernism is its disdain for mass culture, despite mass culture 's undeniable presence in modernist literature. American authors writing during the early twentieth century tried to establish themselves as "highbrow" by leaving the U.S. and traveling to Europe. In doing so, they created a particular aesthetic characterized by depictions of the transportation that facilitated this travel. These depictions reveal modernism's dependence on mass culture, and more importantly, create a space in which modernist authors can negotiate what was once a choice between high or low culture, exile or tourist, and ultimately, modernism or mass culture. Analyzing the car and train scenes in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender is the Night and Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises reveals the hybrid spaces made available to these authors through transportation.
Title: Mobile Modernity: Transportation in the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway.
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Name(s): Johnston, Carrie E.
Furman, Andrew, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2008
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 63 p.
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: A central paradox in modernism is its disdain for mass culture, despite mass culture 's undeniable presence in modernist literature. American authors writing during the early twentieth century tried to establish themselves as "highbrow" by leaving the U.S. and traveling to Europe. In doing so, they created a particular aesthetic characterized by depictions of the transportation that facilitated this travel. These depictions reveal modernism's dependence on mass culture, and more importantly, create a space in which modernist authors can negotiate what was once a choice between high or low culture, exile or tourist, and ultimately, modernism or mass culture. Analyzing the car and train scenes in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender is the Night and Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises reveals the hybrid spaces made available to these authors through transportation.
Identifier: FA00000930 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2008.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Subject(s): Fitzgerald, F Scott--(Francis Scott),--1896-1940--Tender is the night--Criticism and interpretation
Hemingway, Ernest,--1899-1961--Sun also rises--Criticism and interpretation
Literature and society--United States
Symbolism in literature
Travel in literature
Postmodernism (Literature)
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000930
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.