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Sexual and Ontogenetic Dimorphisms in the Anterior Lateral Line Nerve of the Yellow Singray, Urobatis jamaicensis

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Date Issued:
2017
Summary:
To fully understand the function of the elasmobranch electrosensory system it is necessary to examine electrosensory nerves extending from the ampullae of Lorenzini to the central nervous system. Studies detailing the composition of sensory axons are rare, but they have shown that ontogenetic and sexual dimorphism exists in the anterior lateral line nerve (ALLN) of numerous species. This study obtained a count of the number of axons comprising the ALLN in male vs. female and adult vs. juvenile yellow stingrays (Urobatis jamaicensis). We hypothesized that males have more axons than females, and that the number of axons is ontogenetically constant. We expect males to have 30% more axons in their ALLN, and that the number of axons is ontogenetically constant for both sexes. This study will provide unique data about the electrosensory nerves of Yellow stingrays that can be used in future studies to make comparisons between other species.
Title: Sexual and Ontogenetic Dimorphisms in the Anterior Lateral Line Nerve of the Yellow Singray, Urobatis jamaicensis.
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Name(s): Kramer, Katie
Newton, Kyle C.
Kajiura, Stephen M.
Office of Undergraduate Research and Inquiry
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Poster
Date Created: 2017
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Florida
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 1 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: To fully understand the function of the elasmobranch electrosensory system it is necessary to examine electrosensory nerves extending from the ampullae of Lorenzini to the central nervous system. Studies detailing the composition of sensory axons are rare, but they have shown that ontogenetic and sexual dimorphism exists in the anterior lateral line nerve (ALLN) of numerous species. This study obtained a count of the number of axons comprising the ALLN in male vs. female and adult vs. juvenile yellow stingrays (Urobatis jamaicensis). We hypothesized that males have more axons than females, and that the number of axons is ontogenetically constant. We expect males to have 30% more axons in their ALLN, and that the number of axons is ontogenetically constant for both sexes. This study will provide unique data about the electrosensory nerves of Yellow stingrays that can be used in future studies to make comparisons between other species.
Identifier: FA00005624 (IID)
Subject(s): College students --Research --United States.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00005624
Restrictions on Access: Author retains rights.
Host Institution: FAU