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Neural Information Processing Underlying Rhythmic Bimanual Coordination: Theory, Method and Experiment

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Date Issued:
2007
Summary:
How do neuronal connectivity and the dynamics of distributed brain networks process information during bimanual coordination? Contemporary brain theories of cognitive function posit spatial, temporal and spatiotemporal network reorganization as mechanisms for neural information processing. In this dissertation, rhythmic bimanual coordination is studied as a window into neural information processing and subsequently an investigation of underlying network reorganization processes is performed. Spatiotemporal reorganization between effectors (limbs) is parameterized in a theoretical model via a continuously varying cross-talk parameter that represents neural connectivity. Thereby, effector dynamics during coordinated behavior is shown to be influenced by the cross-talk parameter and time delays involved in signal processing. In particular, stability regimes of coordination patterns as a function of cross-talk, movement frequency and the time delays are derived. On the methodological front , spatiotemporal reorganization of neural masses are used to simulate electroencephalographic data. A suitable choice of experimental control conditions is used to derive a paradigmatic framework called Mode Level Cognitive Subtraction (MLCS) which is demonstrated to facilitate the disambiguation between spatial and temporal components of the reorganization processes to a quantifiable degree of certainty. In the experimental section, MLCS is applied to electroencephalographic recordings during rhythmic bimanual task conditions and unimanual control conditions. Finally, a classification of reorganization processes is achieved for differing stability states of coordination: inphase (mirror) primarily entails temporal reorganization of sensorimotor networks localized during unimanual movement whereas spatiotemporal reorganization is involved during antiphase (parallel) coordination.
Title: Neural Information Processing Underlying Rhythmic Bimanual Coordination: Theory, Method and Experiment.
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Name(s): Banerjee, Arpan, author
Jirsa, Viktor K., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2007
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 117 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: How do neuronal connectivity and the dynamics of distributed brain networks process information during bimanual coordination? Contemporary brain theories of cognitive function posit spatial, temporal and spatiotemporal network reorganization as mechanisms for neural information processing. In this dissertation, rhythmic bimanual coordination is studied as a window into neural information processing and subsequently an investigation of underlying network reorganization processes is performed. Spatiotemporal reorganization between effectors (limbs) is parameterized in a theoretical model via a continuously varying cross-talk parameter that represents neural connectivity. Thereby, effector dynamics during coordinated behavior is shown to be influenced by the cross-talk parameter and time delays involved in signal processing. In particular, stability regimes of coordination patterns as a function of cross-talk, movement frequency and the time delays are derived. On the methodological front , spatiotemporal reorganization of neural masses are used to simulate electroencephalographic data. A suitable choice of experimental control conditions is used to derive a paradigmatic framework called Mode Level Cognitive Subtraction (MLCS) which is demonstrated to facilitate the disambiguation between spatial and temporal components of the reorganization processes to a quantifiable degree of certainty. In the experimental section, MLCS is applied to electroencephalographic recordings during rhythmic bimanual task conditions and unimanual control conditions. Finally, a classification of reorganization processes is achieved for differing stability states of coordination: inphase (mirror) primarily entails temporal reorganization of sensorimotor networks localized during unimanual movement whereas spatiotemporal reorganization is involved during antiphase (parallel) coordination.
Identifier: FA00000849 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2007.
Subject(s): Neural networks (Computer science)
Biological control systems
Mind and body
Cognitive psychology
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000849
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.