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Distribution and Survival of Micrococcaceae in Marine Waters of Southeast Florida (Boca Raton and Pompano Beach)

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Date Issued:
1969
Summary:
This study was undertaken to determine the distribution and possible source of Staphylococcus aureus, s. epidermidis, other Micrococcaceae , and enterococci recovered from samples of water collected at the following locations: the Pompano Beach sewage outfall, the Intracoastal Waterway, 5 miles due east of the Boca Raton Inlet, over the 65 ft Boca Raton reef, and in 5 ft of water along the Boca Raton beach. It was also of interest to study the feasibility of employing s. aureus as an indicator of fecal pollution in the marine environment. Neither staphylococci nor enterococci were recovered from 5 samples of beach sand collected from the high tide line to the low tide line. Only low concentrations of staphylococci were recovered from samples collected from the Intracoastal Waterway. The staphylococci recovered from the marine locations do not appear to be true marine bacteria. They do not appear to be originating from bathers, beach washings or the Intracoastal Waterway. Sampling was inadequate to reach definite conclusions on the origin of the Micrococcaceae recovered in the ocean. However, these data indicate the staphylococci originate from the Pompano Beach sewage outfall. Staphylococcus aureus appears to be more resistant to the conditions of the marine environment than the other Micrococcaceae, enterococci or other sewage bacteria recovered on Mannitol Salt Agar and m-Enterococcus Agar. The mean per cent recovery of S. aureus increases with increased distances downstream from the outfall to the 65 ft reef and sampling site 5 miles offshore. ~· aureus appears to be a good indicator of fecal pollution in the marine environment. Survival studies of washed cells of a coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus run in autoclaved sea water and autoclaved Intracoastal water gave mean decimal reduction times of 16.6 hr and 11.4 hr, respectively. Staphylococci were not recovered from Bryothamnion triguetrum,Caulerpa sertularioides f. brevipes, Dasycladus vermicularis or Padina sanctae-crucis. Ten Micrococcaceae recovered from the ocean were not inhibited by extracts prepared from these algae. Intact segments of these algae possessed antibacterial activity against most, if not all of these Micrococcaceae.
Title: Distribution and Survival of Micrococcaceae in Marine Waters of Southeast Florida (Boca Raton and Pompano Beach).
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Name(s): Thompson, Mary C.
Hoffmann, H. A., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 1969
Date Issued: 1969
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 65 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This study was undertaken to determine the distribution and possible source of Staphylococcus aureus, s. epidermidis, other Micrococcaceae , and enterococci recovered from samples of water collected at the following locations: the Pompano Beach sewage outfall, the Intracoastal Waterway, 5 miles due east of the Boca Raton Inlet, over the 65 ft Boca Raton reef, and in 5 ft of water along the Boca Raton beach. It was also of interest to study the feasibility of employing s. aureus as an indicator of fecal pollution in the marine environment. Neither staphylococci nor enterococci were recovered from 5 samples of beach sand collected from the high tide line to the low tide line. Only low concentrations of staphylococci were recovered from samples collected from the Intracoastal Waterway. The staphylococci recovered from the marine locations do not appear to be true marine bacteria. They do not appear to be originating from bathers, beach washings or the Intracoastal Waterway. Sampling was inadequate to reach definite conclusions on the origin of the Micrococcaceae recovered in the ocean. However, these data indicate the staphylococci originate from the Pompano Beach sewage outfall. Staphylococcus aureus appears to be more resistant to the conditions of the marine environment than the other Micrococcaceae, enterococci or other sewage bacteria recovered on Mannitol Salt Agar and m-Enterococcus Agar. The mean per cent recovery of S. aureus increases with increased distances downstream from the outfall to the 65 ft reef and sampling site 5 miles offshore. ~· aureus appears to be a good indicator of fecal pollution in the marine environment. Survival studies of washed cells of a coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus run in autoclaved sea water and autoclaved Intracoastal water gave mean decimal reduction times of 16.6 hr and 11.4 hr, respectively. Staphylococci were not recovered from Bryothamnion triguetrum,Caulerpa sertularioides f. brevipes, Dasycladus vermicularis or Padina sanctae-crucis. Ten Micrococcaceae recovered from the ocean were not inhibited by extracts prepared from these algae. Intact segments of these algae possessed antibacterial activity against most, if not all of these Micrococcaceae.
Identifier: FA00000840 (IID)
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1969.
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Subject(s): Staphylococcus aureus
Sewage disposal in the ocean--Florida
Marine pollution
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000840
Sublocation: Digital Library
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.