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Wave Ship Interaction in Transforming Seas

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Date Issued:
2017
Summary:
In near-shore transforming seas, as waves approach the shoreline, wave shoaling and sometimes wave breaking take place due to the decreasing water depth. When a ship advances through the transforming seas, the ship body and waves interact with each other substantially and can lead to unknown motions of the ship hull. The physical process of how the wave transforms in the surf zone and how the vehicle actually behaves when it passes through the transforming seas is a complicated issue that triggers considerable research interest. The goal of my research is to characterize the dynamics of a high-speed surface ship model in transforming seas through a parametric numerical study of the shipwave interactions. In this study, the vehicle of interest is a surface effect ship (SES) and we aim to contribute to developing a methodology for simulating the transforming wave environment, including wave breaking, and its interactions with the SES. The thesis work uses a commercial software package ANSYS Fluent to generate numerical waves and model the interface between water and air using the volume of fluid (VoF) method. A ship motion solver and the dynamic mesh are used to enable the modeled ship to perform three degree-of-freedom (DoF) motion and the near-region of the ship hull to deform as well as re-mesh. Non-conformal meshes with hybrid compositions of different cell types and various grid sizes are used in the simulations for different purposes. Five user-defined functions (UDFs) are dynamically linked with the flow solver to incorporates ship/grid motions, wave damping and output of the numerical results. A series of steps were taken sequentially: 1) validation for ship motions including simulation of a static Wigley hull under steady flows to compare against previous experimental results by other researchers, and the comparison between the static SES model under steady flows and the moving SES model advancing in the calm water; 2) study of the ship with 3 DoF advancing in calm water of both constant depth and varying depth; 3) validation for numerical waves, including predictions of numerically progressive waves in both a regular tank and a tank with a sloped fringing reef to compare with theoretical and experimental results, respectively; 4) investigation of the transforming characteristics of the wave traveling over the sloped fringing reef, which mimics the near-shore wave environment and a study of the dynamics of the SES through transforming waves. We find that the flow solver used in this study reliably models the wave profiles along the ship hull. The comparison between a static SES in a current and a moving SES in calm water at the same Froude number shows that although the velocity fields around the vehicle are significantly different, the wave profiles inside and outside the rigid cushion of the vehicle are similar and the resistance force experienced by the vehicle in the two scenarios agree well over time. We conducted five numerical simulations of the vehicle traveling from shallow water to deep water across the transition zone for different Froude numbers. From the results, we find that as the Froude number increases, the wave resistance force on the vehicle becomes larger in both shallow water and deep water. In addition, the overall mean resistance force experienced by the vehicle over the whole trip increases with the Froude number. Statistical analysis of the wave motions suggests that the energy flux decreases dramatically in the onshore direction as the waves break. The more severe the wave-breaking process, the greater the decrease in energy flux. Both the increase of Froude number and the wave steepness apparently increase the resistance force on the vehicle in the shallow water. This thesis work captures the impact of the transforming characteristics of the waves and closely replicates the behavior of how waves interact with a ship in transforming seas through numerical modeling and simulation.
Title: Wave Ship Interaction in Transforming Seas.
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Name(s): Gong, Fuxian, author
Dhanak, Manhar R., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2017
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 142 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: In near-shore transforming seas, as waves approach the shoreline, wave shoaling and sometimes wave breaking take place due to the decreasing water depth. When a ship advances through the transforming seas, the ship body and waves interact with each other substantially and can lead to unknown motions of the ship hull. The physical process of how the wave transforms in the surf zone and how the vehicle actually behaves when it passes through the transforming seas is a complicated issue that triggers considerable research interest. The goal of my research is to characterize the dynamics of a high-speed surface ship model in transforming seas through a parametric numerical study of the shipwave interactions. In this study, the vehicle of interest is a surface effect ship (SES) and we aim to contribute to developing a methodology for simulating the transforming wave environment, including wave breaking, and its interactions with the SES. The thesis work uses a commercial software package ANSYS Fluent to generate numerical waves and model the interface between water and air using the volume of fluid (VoF) method. A ship motion solver and the dynamic mesh are used to enable the modeled ship to perform three degree-of-freedom (DoF) motion and the near-region of the ship hull to deform as well as re-mesh. Non-conformal meshes with hybrid compositions of different cell types and various grid sizes are used in the simulations for different purposes. Five user-defined functions (UDFs) are dynamically linked with the flow solver to incorporates ship/grid motions, wave damping and output of the numerical results. A series of steps were taken sequentially: 1) validation for ship motions including simulation of a static Wigley hull under steady flows to compare against previous experimental results by other researchers, and the comparison between the static SES model under steady flows and the moving SES model advancing in the calm water; 2) study of the ship with 3 DoF advancing in calm water of both constant depth and varying depth; 3) validation for numerical waves, including predictions of numerically progressive waves in both a regular tank and a tank with a sloped fringing reef to compare with theoretical and experimental results, respectively; 4) investigation of the transforming characteristics of the wave traveling over the sloped fringing reef, which mimics the near-shore wave environment and a study of the dynamics of the SES through transforming waves. We find that the flow solver used in this study reliably models the wave profiles along the ship hull. The comparison between a static SES in a current and a moving SES in calm water at the same Froude number shows that although the velocity fields around the vehicle are significantly different, the wave profiles inside and outside the rigid cushion of the vehicle are similar and the resistance force experienced by the vehicle in the two scenarios agree well over time. We conducted five numerical simulations of the vehicle traveling from shallow water to deep water across the transition zone for different Froude numbers. From the results, we find that as the Froude number increases, the wave resistance force on the vehicle becomes larger in both shallow water and deep water. In addition, the overall mean resistance force experienced by the vehicle over the whole trip increases with the Froude number. Statistical analysis of the wave motions suggests that the energy flux decreases dramatically in the onshore direction as the waves break. The more severe the wave-breaking process, the greater the decrease in energy flux. Both the increase of Froude number and the wave steepness apparently increase the resistance force on the vehicle in the shallow water. This thesis work captures the impact of the transforming characteristics of the waves and closely replicates the behavior of how waves interact with a ship in transforming seas through numerical modeling and simulation.
Identifier: FA00004916 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2017.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Hydrodynamics--Mathematical models.
Fluid dynamics--Mathematical models.
Ocean waves--Measurement.
Water waves--Measurement.
Coastal engineering.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004916
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004916
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.