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Applications of pulse width modulation to LEDs, fuel cells and battery technology

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Date Issued:
2011
Summary:
It has become a case of great desire and, in some instances, a requirement to have systems in engineering be energy efficient, in addition to being effectively powerful. It is rare that there is a single technique that has the range to make this possible in a wide collection of areas in the field. The work done in this thesis exhibits how Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) bridges LEDs, plug in vehicles, fuel cells and batteries, all seemingly different sub categories of electrical engineering. It stems from an undergraduate directed independent study supervised by Dr. Zilouchian that encircled LEDs and electric vehicles and how they contribute to a smart electric grid. This thesis covers the design and development of a prototype board that test how PWM saves energy, prolongs lifespan and provides a host of customizable features in manufactured LED lights that are used in the marine industry. Additionally, the concept of charging batteries that provide power to electric vehicles was explored. It is stressed that consumers who are interested in electric vehicles are concerned about refueling and recharge times. It is natural that a competing product, such as the electric vehicle in a world dominated by internal combustion engines, will perform on par if not better than existing choices. Tests are conducted to investigate the methods of fast battery charging and the challenges this technique creates. Attention is also given to the development of a pulsed Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, specifically to prove whether pulse modulation is more efficient in a hydrogen producing fuel cell as opposed to direct-driven voltage and current alternatives.
Title: Applications of pulse width modulation to LEDs, fuel cells and battery technology.
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Name(s): Watt, Wayne W.
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xv, 121p. : ill. (some col.)
Language(s): English
Summary: It has become a case of great desire and, in some instances, a requirement to have systems in engineering be energy efficient, in addition to being effectively powerful. It is rare that there is a single technique that has the range to make this possible in a wide collection of areas in the field. The work done in this thesis exhibits how Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) bridges LEDs, plug in vehicles, fuel cells and batteries, all seemingly different sub categories of electrical engineering. It stems from an undergraduate directed independent study supervised by Dr. Zilouchian that encircled LEDs and electric vehicles and how they contribute to a smart electric grid. This thesis covers the design and development of a prototype board that test how PWM saves energy, prolongs lifespan and provides a host of customizable features in manufactured LED lights that are used in the marine industry. Additionally, the concept of charging batteries that provide power to electric vehicles was explored. It is stressed that consumers who are interested in electric vehicles are concerned about refueling and recharge times. It is natural that a competing product, such as the electric vehicle in a world dominated by internal combustion engines, will perform on par if not better than existing choices. Tests are conducted to investigate the methods of fast battery charging and the challenges this technique creates. Attention is also given to the development of a pulsed Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, specifically to prove whether pulse modulation is more efficient in a hydrogen producing fuel cell as opposed to direct-driven voltage and current alternatives.
Identifier: 748266725 (oclc), 3174313 (digitool), FADT3174313 (IID), fau:3681 (fedora)
Note(s): by Wayne W. Watt.
Thesis (M.S.C.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2011.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 200?. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Power electronics
Digital control systems
Electric current converters
Fuel cells -- Economic aspects
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/3174313
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU