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Isolation and structure elucidation of novel compounds from marine cyanobacteria

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Date Issued:
2010
Summary:
The work of this dissertation examined the secondary metabolites of several blooms of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya collected in Guam and Florida with an emphasis on the isolation and structure elucidation of novel biologically active compounds. The introduction in Chapter One provides a brief history of marine natural products, a description of cyanobacteria and a summary of peptides isolated from Lyngbya collected in the Caribbean. In Chapter Two, a bioassay-guided fractionation of a Floridian collection of Lyngbya polychroa led to the isolation and structural determination of the cytotoxin desacetylmicrocolin B and the known compounds microcolins A and B. The structures were established by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis. All three compounds inhibited the growth of cancer cell lines HT-29 and IMR-32 at nanomolar concentrations. Microcolins A and B were found to have little activity in the ecological assay against the marine fungus Dendryphiella salina. Chapter Three describes the isolation and structure elucidation of the glycosidic, acyl proline derivative tumonoic acid J from a sample Lyngbya sp. collected in Guam. The planar structure was determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with high resolution-mass spectrometry (HR-MS) data. Tumonoic acid J showed moderate activity in the ecological assay against the marine fungus D. salina. In Chapter Four, NMR-guided fractionation of a Floridian sample of Lyngbya majuscula led to the isolation of two novel cyclic peptides porpoisamides A and B. The planar structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy with HR-MS data. The absolute configurations of these two compounds were defined through chiral chromatographic methods and derivatization techniques.
Title: Isolation and structure elucidation of novel compounds from marine cyanobacteria.
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Name(s): Meickle, Theresa
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xvi, 130 p. : ill. (some col.)
Language(s): English
Summary: The work of this dissertation examined the secondary metabolites of several blooms of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya collected in Guam and Florida with an emphasis on the isolation and structure elucidation of novel biologically active compounds. The introduction in Chapter One provides a brief history of marine natural products, a description of cyanobacteria and a summary of peptides isolated from Lyngbya collected in the Caribbean. In Chapter Two, a bioassay-guided fractionation of a Floridian collection of Lyngbya polychroa led to the isolation and structural determination of the cytotoxin desacetylmicrocolin B and the known compounds microcolins A and B. The structures were established by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis. All three compounds inhibited the growth of cancer cell lines HT-29 and IMR-32 at nanomolar concentrations. Microcolins A and B were found to have little activity in the ecological assay against the marine fungus Dendryphiella salina. Chapter Three describes the isolation and structure elucidation of the glycosidic, acyl proline derivative tumonoic acid J from a sample Lyngbya sp. collected in Guam. The planar structure was determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with high resolution-mass spectrometry (HR-MS) data. Tumonoic acid J showed moderate activity in the ecological assay against the marine fungus D. salina. In Chapter Four, NMR-guided fractionation of a Floridian sample of Lyngbya majuscula led to the isolation of two novel cyclic peptides porpoisamides A and B. The planar structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy with HR-MS data. The absolute configurations of these two compounds were defined through chiral chromatographic methods and derivatization techniques.
Summary: The porpoisamides showed only moderate activity in cytotoxicity assays against cancer cell lines HCT-116 and U2OS. Finally, Chapter Five examines a potential ecological role of compounds isolated from marine cyanobacte ria. These secondary metabolites may function as chemical defenses against competing microorganisms within marine environments. Compounds isolated from cyanobacteria were tested for anti-fungal activity against the saprophytic marine fungus D. salina. Three of the six compounds tested produced inhibitory activity at or below their natural concentration.
Identifier: 703255662 (oclc), 2978991 (digitool), FADT2978991 (IID), fau:3595 (fedora)
Note(s): by Theresa Meickle.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2010.
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2010. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Sponges -- Ecology
Cyanobacteria -- Biological control
Aquatic ecology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/2978991
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU