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Barometric distillation and the problem of non-condensable gases

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Date Issued:
2010
Summary:
Barometric distillation is an alternative method of producing fresh water by desalination. This proposed process evaporates saline water at low pressure and consequently low temperature; low pressure conditions are achieved by use of barometric columns and condensation is by direct contact with a supply of fresh water that will be augmented by the distillate. Low-temperature sources of heat, such as the cooling water rejected by electrical power generating facilities, can supply this system with the latent heat of evaporation. Experiments are presented that show successful distillation with a temperature difference between evaporator and condenser smaller than 10ê C. Accumulation of dissolved gases coming out of solution, a classic problem in lowpressure distillation, is indirectly measured using a gas-tension sensor. The results of these experiments are used in an analysis of the specific energy required by a production process capable of producing 15 liters per hour. With a 20ê C difference, and neglecting latent heat, this analysis yields a specific energy of 1.85 kilowatt-hour per cubic meter, consumed by water pumping and by removal of non-condensable gases.
Title: Barometric distillation and the problem of non-condensable gases.
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Name(s): Martinson, Eiki.
College of Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: xi, 124 p. : ill.
Language(s): English
Summary: Barometric distillation is an alternative method of producing fresh water by desalination. This proposed process evaporates saline water at low pressure and consequently low temperature; low pressure conditions are achieved by use of barometric columns and condensation is by direct contact with a supply of fresh water that will be augmented by the distillate. Low-temperature sources of heat, such as the cooling water rejected by electrical power generating facilities, can supply this system with the latent heat of evaporation. Experiments are presented that show successful distillation with a temperature difference between evaporator and condenser smaller than 10ê C. Accumulation of dissolved gases coming out of solution, a classic problem in lowpressure distillation, is indirectly measured using a gas-tension sensor. The results of these experiments are used in an analysis of the specific energy required by a production process capable of producing 15 liters per hour. With a 20ê C difference, and neglecting latent heat, this analysis yields a specific energy of 1.85 kilowatt-hour per cubic meter, consumed by water pumping and by removal of non-condensable gases.
Identifier: 703612908 (oclc), 2978949 (digitool), FADT2978949 (IID), fau:3589 (fedora)
Note(s): by Eiki Martinson.
Thesis (M.S.C.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2010
Includes bibliography.
Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2010. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Subject(s): Chemistry, Physical and theoretical
Fluid mechanics
Saline water conversion
Renewable energy sources
Groundwater -- Purification
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/FAU/2978949
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU