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A Longitudinal Investigation ofFriendship Similarity: Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Behavior

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Date Issued:
2008
Summary:
The current study examined the homophilic processes of selection and socialization in same-sex adolescent friendships across a 3-year period. The framework of the actor-partner interdependence model for distinguishable dyads was the main analytic technique, an improvement over previous analysis methods which often did not allow for simultaneous exploration of selection and socialization. Within the friendships, adolescents were distinguished based on their general peer acceptance levels, and similarity was assessed for three behaviors: deviant behavior, depression, and achievement motivation. Results showed evidence of both selection and socialization for deviant behavior and achievement motivation, but not for depression. Furthermore, partner influence paths suggested that more accepted friends typically exerted more influence on less accepted friends. Gender also moderated results, with girls tending to have stronger effects than boys.
Title: A Longitudinal Investigation ofFriendship Similarity: Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Behavior.
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Name(s): Hafen, Christopher A., author
Laursen, Brett, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2008
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 82 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The current study examined the homophilic processes of selection and socialization in same-sex adolescent friendships across a 3-year period. The framework of the actor-partner interdependence model for distinguishable dyads was the main analytic technique, an improvement over previous analysis methods which often did not allow for simultaneous exploration of selection and socialization. Within the friendships, adolescents were distinguished based on their general peer acceptance levels, and similarity was assessed for three behaviors: deviant behavior, depression, and achievement motivation. Results showed evidence of both selection and socialization for deviant behavior and achievement motivation, but not for depression. Furthermore, partner influence paths suggested that more accepted friends typically exerted more influence on less accepted friends. Gender also moderated results, with girls tending to have stronger effects than boys.
Identifier: FA00000756 (IID)
Note(s): Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 1968.
Subject(s): Interaction analysis in education
Interpersonal relations
Adolescent psychology
Adolescence and society
Social interaction in adolescence
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000756
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000756
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.