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The relationship between the self-efficacy of monolingual and bilingual undergraduate college students and their academic achievement in science and math.

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
Almost twenty-one percent of the United States population spoke a language other than English in 2011. Furthermore, there has been a dramatic increase in the enrollment of students of Hispanic and other ethnic backgrounds in U.S. post-secondary institutions between 1976 and 2013 (from 4% to 16%) (National Center for Education Statistics NCES, 2016). Until now, no systematic research has focused on the differential effects of selfefficacy on academic achievement in monolingual and bilingual undergraduate college students. The present study aimed to investigate this relationship, as well as contribute additional insight on whether the academic self-efficacy of monolingual and bilingual undergraduate college students plays a role in their academic success specifically in science and math courses. Additionally, the findings of this research study were expected to provide data to inform the development of educational programs that might specifically target monolinguals or bilinguals in enhancing students’ self-efficacy. Seven instructors of foundational undergraduate science courses and math courses at a southeastern university agreed to contribute to the study by asking their students for their voluntary participation in the data collection. A total of 361 students participated in the study. Overall, 256 (70.9%) participants reported being monolingual and 105 (29.1%) reported being bilingual; 335 (92.8%) students were enrolled in science courses and 26 (7.2%) were registered in math courses; 237 (65.7%) were female students and 124 (34.3%) were male. Demographics, self-efficacy, and sociolinguistic data were collected using the Self-Efficacy Research Study Online Questionnaire. Final science and math grades were also collected from the instructors at the end of the semester for all students who volunteered to participate in the study. The findings of this research study revealed that the self-efficacy levels of undergraduate college students in science and math predict their academic achievement in these subjects. They also showed that the self-efficacy levels of bilingual participants are higher than those of their monolingual counterparts. Findings also indicated that when the relationship between final grade and self-efficacy was examined separately in each linguistic group the correlation was significant and positive for monolinguals.
Title: The relationship between the self-efficacy of monolingual and bilingual undergraduate college students and their academic achievement in science and math.
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Name(s): Pomerantz, Rina, author
Bryan, Valerie, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Education
Department of Educational Leadership and Research Methodology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2016
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 155 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Almost twenty-one percent of the United States population spoke a language other than English in 2011. Furthermore, there has been a dramatic increase in the enrollment of students of Hispanic and other ethnic backgrounds in U.S. post-secondary institutions between 1976 and 2013 (from 4% to 16%) (National Center for Education Statistics NCES, 2016). Until now, no systematic research has focused on the differential effects of selfefficacy on academic achievement in monolingual and bilingual undergraduate college students. The present study aimed to investigate this relationship, as well as contribute additional insight on whether the academic self-efficacy of monolingual and bilingual undergraduate college students plays a role in their academic success specifically in science and math courses. Additionally, the findings of this research study were expected to provide data to inform the development of educational programs that might specifically target monolinguals or bilinguals in enhancing students’ self-efficacy. Seven instructors of foundational undergraduate science courses and math courses at a southeastern university agreed to contribute to the study by asking their students for their voluntary participation in the data collection. A total of 361 students participated in the study. Overall, 256 (70.9%) participants reported being monolingual and 105 (29.1%) reported being bilingual; 335 (92.8%) students were enrolled in science courses and 26 (7.2%) were registered in math courses; 237 (65.7%) were female students and 124 (34.3%) were male. Demographics, self-efficacy, and sociolinguistic data were collected using the Self-Efficacy Research Study Online Questionnaire. Final science and math grades were also collected from the instructors at the end of the semester for all students who volunteered to participate in the study. The findings of this research study revealed that the self-efficacy levels of undergraduate college students in science and math predict their academic achievement in these subjects. They also showed that the self-efficacy levels of bilingual participants are higher than those of their monolingual counterparts. Findings also indicated that when the relationship between final grade and self-efficacy was examined separately in each linguistic group the correlation was significant and positive for monolinguals.
Identifier: FA00004753 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2016.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Self-efficacy.
Control (Psychology)
Academic achievement--Psychological aspects.
Education, Bilingual.
Science--Study and teaching (Higher)
Mathematics--Study and teaching (Higher)
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004753
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004753
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.