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The expression and analysis of a lysine-rich wound-response protein in tomato plants.

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
Understanding the genetic regulation of the response to wounding and wound healing in fruiting plants is imperative to maintaining agricultural sustainability, preserving the quality of food supplies, and ensuring the economic viability of agriculture. Many genes are known to be induced by wounding, providing both structural repair and defense. The KED gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been shown to be induced by wounding. We have identified its homologue gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) that we named SlKED. We have analyzed gene expression pattern of SlKED through tomato growth and development and in response to wounding as well as hormonal and inhibitor treatments. We found that the plant hormone ethylene played a major role in the expression of SlKED. To further identify evidence for physiological and transductional functions of KED and SlKED, the tobacco KED gene was introduced to tomato and overexpressed by the fruit tissue-active PUN1 promoter from pepper (Capsicum annuum,). The expression of this gene was compared to the expression of the native SlKED gene and other known wound response genes in both the wild-type and transgenic tomato plants. The upregulation of the native SlKED gene by wounding was significantly muted in the tobacco KED-expressing transgenic plants. The expression of other genes known to be associated with wound response transduction pathways was also altered. Our studies implicate the KED gene in defense mechanisms for mechanical stress in tomato plants.
Title: The expression and analysis of a lysine-rich wound-response protein in tomato plants.
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Name(s): Kaplan, Noah, author
Zhang, Xing-Hai, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Department of Biological Sciences
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2016
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 37 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Understanding the genetic regulation of the response to wounding and wound healing in fruiting plants is imperative to maintaining agricultural sustainability, preserving the quality of food supplies, and ensuring the economic viability of agriculture. Many genes are known to be induced by wounding, providing both structural repair and defense. The KED gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been shown to be induced by wounding. We have identified its homologue gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) that we named SlKED. We have analyzed gene expression pattern of SlKED through tomato growth and development and in response to wounding as well as hormonal and inhibitor treatments. We found that the plant hormone ethylene played a major role in the expression of SlKED. To further identify evidence for physiological and transductional functions of KED and SlKED, the tobacco KED gene was introduced to tomato and overexpressed by the fruit tissue-active PUN1 promoter from pepper (Capsicum annuum,). The expression of this gene was compared to the expression of the native SlKED gene and other known wound response genes in both the wild-type and transgenic tomato plants. The upregulation of the native SlKED gene by wounding was significantly muted in the tobacco KED-expressing transgenic plants. The expression of other genes known to be associated with wound response transduction pathways was also altered. Our studies implicate the KED gene in defense mechanisms for mechanical stress in tomato plants.
Identifier: FA00004773 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2016.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Wound healing.
Wounds and injuries--Genetic aspects.
Plant gene expression.
Plant genetic regulation.
Nanostructured materials--Physiological effect.
Biomedical engineering.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004773
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004773
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.