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Self-Directed Learning and the Lupus Patient: Using Adult: Education Strategies to Actively Cope with Chronic Illness

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the significance of a patient’s active or passive role in terms of his/her health management; 2) to determine if a relationship exists between one’s active and passive scores and his/her self-directed learning readiness, and 3) to identify if his/her view of one’s self as a patient (when diagnosed with a chronic disease) impacted his/her own personal health management. Utilizing the quantitative analysis of The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale and the Vanderbilt Pain Management Inventory, 81 individuals’ descriptive statistics were analyzed. Self-directed learning was found to positively influence an individual’s ability to be an active patient. The moderated demographic characteristics of age, ethnicity, education level, and gender did not have a direct relationship between selfdirected learning readiness and active/passive coping groups. Further, it was established that the majority of the participants within the study, 83.75%, considered themselves an active patient managing their lupus diagnosis. However, 16.25% of the participants did not believe that they were actively managing their illness. Self-directed learning characteristics were examined through the responses to an open-ended question. The two most prevalent themes pertained to active coping and control. Characteristics of self-directed learning readiness appeared predominant amongst the responses, particularly goal-orientation and accepting responsibility for learning. Minimal themes regarding planning and enjoying learning were provided within the data. These characteristics were identified throughout the study in hopes of further research and program implementations that will help to develop leadership abilities and activity levels of self-health management in chronically ill patients. This will enable lupus patients to have a more positive outcome, it will help them successfully manage their own health, and it will improve their overall quality of life.
Title: Self-Directed Learning and the Lupus Patient: Using Adult: Education Strategies to Actively Cope with Chronic Illness.
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Name(s): Brittain, Kristin, author
Bryan, Valerie, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
College of Education
Department of Educational Leadership and Research Methodology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2016
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 191 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the significance of a patient’s active or passive role in terms of his/her health management; 2) to determine if a relationship exists between one’s active and passive scores and his/her self-directed learning readiness, and 3) to identify if his/her view of one’s self as a patient (when diagnosed with a chronic disease) impacted his/her own personal health management. Utilizing the quantitative analysis of The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale and the Vanderbilt Pain Management Inventory, 81 individuals’ descriptive statistics were analyzed. Self-directed learning was found to positively influence an individual’s ability to be an active patient. The moderated demographic characteristics of age, ethnicity, education level, and gender did not have a direct relationship between selfdirected learning readiness and active/passive coping groups. Further, it was established that the majority of the participants within the study, 83.75%, considered themselves an active patient managing their lupus diagnosis. However, 16.25% of the participants did not believe that they were actively managing their illness. Self-directed learning characteristics were examined through the responses to an open-ended question. The two most prevalent themes pertained to active coping and control. Characteristics of self-directed learning readiness appeared predominant amongst the responses, particularly goal-orientation and accepting responsibility for learning. Minimal themes regarding planning and enjoying learning were provided within the data. These characteristics were identified throughout the study in hopes of further research and program implementations that will help to develop leadership abilities and activity levels of self-health management in chronically ill patients. This will enable lupus patients to have a more positive outcome, it will help them successfully manage their own health, and it will improve their overall quality of life.
Identifier: FA00004663 (IID)
Degree granted: Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2016.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Adjustment (Psychology)
Autoimmune diseases -- Care
Communication in medicine
Health education
Health promotion
Systemic lupus erythematosus
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004663
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004663
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.