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Are Women Moving? Food Insecurity, Obesity, and Women’s Food-Access Strategies in Broward County Florida’s Food Deserts

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
Food insecurity or low-access to good quality, affordable foods affects minority women and children disproportionately (Herndon, 2014; Ivers & Cullen, 2011; Lee, 2012; Wigg Dammann & Smith, 2009). Linked to the rise in nutritionrelated and other health problems afflicting these populations (e.g., malnutrition, obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure among others) (Azarbad & Gonder- Frederick, 2010; Bove & Olson, 2006; Larson, Story, & Nelson, 2009), this issue has been gaining some attention. Still, programs combating weight and “weightrelated disorders” generally focus on individualistic solutions (Orbach, Bodies 2009)—such as increasing daily exercise and vilifying certain diets. Dismissing important spatial and systematic aspects, these approaches rather perpetuate problematic socio-political, economic, medical, and ideological biases informing our understanding of poverty, health and food. This project offers and alternative perspective. Most importantly, it 1) scrutinizes sexist, classist and racist constructs across the literature on overweight, obesity, poverty, and health; 2) examines the relationship between our food system, the growth in nutrition-related diseases, and the intersections of gender, race, and class within food insecure communities; and 3) analyzes interview data looking for important and resonating themes that could guide the development of more efficient local food access strategies. As this study shows, these women’s experiences, knowledge, and strategies have the potential of, not only helping eradicate food insecurity across South Florida, but also combating a great number of the nutrition-related health problems afflicting these populations.
Title: Are Women Moving? Food Insecurity, Obesity, and Women’s Food-Access Strategies in Broward County Florida’s Food Deserts.
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Name(s): Lozano-Baugh, Arely B., author
Cameron, Mary, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters
Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2016
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 91 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: Food insecurity or low-access to good quality, affordable foods affects minority women and children disproportionately (Herndon, 2014; Ivers & Cullen, 2011; Lee, 2012; Wigg Dammann & Smith, 2009). Linked to the rise in nutritionrelated and other health problems afflicting these populations (e.g., malnutrition, obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure among others) (Azarbad & Gonder- Frederick, 2010; Bove & Olson, 2006; Larson, Story, & Nelson, 2009), this issue has been gaining some attention. Still, programs combating weight and “weightrelated disorders” generally focus on individualistic solutions (Orbach, Bodies 2009)—such as increasing daily exercise and vilifying certain diets. Dismissing important spatial and systematic aspects, these approaches rather perpetuate problematic socio-political, economic, medical, and ideological biases informing our understanding of poverty, health and food. This project offers and alternative perspective. Most importantly, it 1) scrutinizes sexist, classist and racist constructs across the literature on overweight, obesity, poverty, and health; 2) examines the relationship between our food system, the growth in nutrition-related diseases, and the intersections of gender, race, and class within food insecure communities; and 3) analyzes interview data looking for important and resonating themes that could guide the development of more efficient local food access strategies. As this study shows, these women’s experiences, knowledge, and strategies have the potential of, not only helping eradicate food insecurity across South Florida, but also combating a great number of the nutrition-related health problems afflicting these populations.
Identifier: FA00004724 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2016.
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Body image
Discrimination against overweight persons
Eating disorders -- Etiology -- Social aspects
Food security
Food supply
Nutrition disorders
Obesity in women
Overweight women
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004724
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004724
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.