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Factors Affecting Registered Nurses' Job satisfaction and Intent to Leave

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Date Issued:
2007
Summary:
It is estimated that there will be a 20% shortage of full time equivalent registered nurses (RN) by 2015. Retention of nurses is a priority in health care, so a better understanding of factors that contribute to job satisfaction and intent to leave is needed. One possible factor is the quality of the interpersonal relationships that occur among managers, peers, and nurses. A negative quality would be acts of hostility or horizontal violence, which is nurse-to-nurse aggression. This is theorized to be a result of oppressed group behavior. These behaviors may influence job satisfaction and the intent to stay on the job and in the profession. The overall purpose of the study was to explore relationships between horizontal violence, oppressed group behavior, job satisfaction and intent to leave a position or nursing in the next 12 months. This pilot study examined factors that influence registered nurses ' job satisfaction and intent to leave a position or nursing. Convenience sampling was used to obtain the sample of registered nurses from a BSN completion program and a Novice Nurse Initiative Program (n=99). Written stories of conflict between nurses were obtained and analyzed with linguistic analysis and word count (LIWC) software and various standardized instruments were used including the Nurses Workplace Behavior Scale (NWBS), the Organizational Climate for Caring Scale (OCCS), the Peer Group Caring Interaction Scale (PGCIS), The McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) and two visual analogue scales (VAS). Significant relationships were found between job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position and nursing (p<.01), oppressed group behavior and intent to stay in nursing (p<.01), oppressed group behavior and job satisfaction (p<.01). Manager and peer caring behaviors were related to intent to stay in a position and nursing (p<.01). Using stepwise multiple regression, both manager and peer caring behaviors were found to influence the relationship between job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position or nursing. The findings of this study suggest that the quality of interpersonal relationships between managers, peers and nurses can influence job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position or nursing.
Title: Factors Affecting Registered Nurses' Job satisfaction and Intent to Leave.
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Name(s): Longo, Joy
Liehr, Patricia, Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2007
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 118 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: It is estimated that there will be a 20% shortage of full time equivalent registered nurses (RN) by 2015. Retention of nurses is a priority in health care, so a better understanding of factors that contribute to job satisfaction and intent to leave is needed. One possible factor is the quality of the interpersonal relationships that occur among managers, peers, and nurses. A negative quality would be acts of hostility or horizontal violence, which is nurse-to-nurse aggression. This is theorized to be a result of oppressed group behavior. These behaviors may influence job satisfaction and the intent to stay on the job and in the profession. The overall purpose of the study was to explore relationships between horizontal violence, oppressed group behavior, job satisfaction and intent to leave a position or nursing in the next 12 months. This pilot study examined factors that influence registered nurses ' job satisfaction and intent to leave a position or nursing. Convenience sampling was used to obtain the sample of registered nurses from a BSN completion program and a Novice Nurse Initiative Program (n=99). Written stories of conflict between nurses were obtained and analyzed with linguistic analysis and word count (LIWC) software and various standardized instruments were used including the Nurses Workplace Behavior Scale (NWBS), the Organizational Climate for Caring Scale (OCCS), the Peer Group Caring Interaction Scale (PGCIS), The McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) and two visual analogue scales (VAS). Significant relationships were found between job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position and nursing (p<.01), oppressed group behavior and intent to stay in nursing (p<.01), oppressed group behavior and job satisfaction (p<.01). Manager and peer caring behaviors were related to intent to stay in a position and nursing (p<.01). Using stepwise multiple regression, both manager and peer caring behaviors were found to influence the relationship between job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position or nursing. The findings of this study suggest that the quality of interpersonal relationships between managers, peers and nurses can influence job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position or nursing.
Identifier: FA00000622 (IID)
Note(s): Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing
Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2007.
Subject(s): Nurses--Job satisfaction
Nursing services--Administration
Burn out (Psychology)--Prevention
Nurses--Job stress
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000622
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Restrictions on Access: Copyright © is held by the author with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.