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How Perceptions of Justice, Children's Lifestyle Satisfaction, and Several Turnover Outcomes Relate to Repatriate and Spouse/Partner Compensation and Lifestyle Satisfaction

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Date Issued:
2007
Summary:
This dissertation analyzes how the reactions of repatriates and spouses/partners about their new lifestyle and compensation package upon repatriation relate to several repatriate turnover outcomes. U.S.-based multinational organizations often provide global assignees with an extensive benefit package, including such items as housing allowances, foreign-service premiums, tuition for international schools, and club memberships. Once the assignment is over, these additional benefits are necessarily terminated. Results of a qualitative analysis of 14 semi-structured interviews and a quantitative analysis of 37 U.S. repatriated executives and 34 spouses/partners of repatriated executives suggest that repatriate perceptions of distributive justice positively relate to all facets of pay satisfaction (i.e. pay level, pay raise, benefits, and pay structure and administration satisfaction), while procedural justice relates positively to pay structure and administration satisfaction. Overall pay satisfaction, in turn, positively relates to the intentions to increase one's investment in company-specific skills. Repatriate and spouse/partner attitudes about the changes in benefits they encounter upon repatriation are predicted by their children's satisfaction with their new lifestyle. Furthermore, some evidence suggests support for the proposition that overall pay satisfaction and benefit change satisfaction of repatriates and spouses/partners negatively relate to the actual turnover of repatriates. The implications drawn from this dissertation inform theories of social status, spillover, equity, and expatriate adjustment. Multinational organizations employing expatriates may additionally consider the practical implications useful when establishing compensation packages and repatriation programs for international assignees.
Title: How Perceptions of Justice, Children's Lifestyle Satisfaction, and Several Turnover Outcomes Relate to Repatriate and Spouse/Partner Compensation and Lifestyle Satisfaction.
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Name(s): Thomason, Stephanie J., author
Peterson, Mark F., Thesis Advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2007
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 244 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: This dissertation analyzes how the reactions of repatriates and spouses/partners about their new lifestyle and compensation package upon repatriation relate to several repatriate turnover outcomes. U.S.-based multinational organizations often provide global assignees with an extensive benefit package, including such items as housing allowances, foreign-service premiums, tuition for international schools, and club memberships. Once the assignment is over, these additional benefits are necessarily terminated. Results of a qualitative analysis of 14 semi-structured interviews and a quantitative analysis of 37 U.S. repatriated executives and 34 spouses/partners of repatriated executives suggest that repatriate perceptions of distributive justice positively relate to all facets of pay satisfaction (i.e. pay level, pay raise, benefits, and pay structure and administration satisfaction), while procedural justice relates positively to pay structure and administration satisfaction. Overall pay satisfaction, in turn, positively relates to the intentions to increase one's investment in company-specific skills. Repatriate and spouse/partner attitudes about the changes in benefits they encounter upon repatriation are predicted by their children's satisfaction with their new lifestyle. Furthermore, some evidence suggests support for the proposition that overall pay satisfaction and benefit change satisfaction of repatriates and spouses/partners negatively relate to the actual turnover of repatriates. The implications drawn from this dissertation inform theories of social status, spillover, equity, and expatriate adjustment. Multinational organizations employing expatriates may additionally consider the practical implications useful when establishing compensation packages and repatriation programs for international assignees.
Identifier: FA00000616 (IID)
Note(s): Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2007.
Subject(s): International business enterprises--Personnel management
Employment in foreign countries
Compensation management
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00000616
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.