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A camera trap study of the cryptic, terrestrial guenon Cercopithecus lomamiensis in central Democratic Republic of Congo

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Date Issued:
2014
Summary:
From October-December 2013, we conducted a camera trap study of the newly discovered primate species lesula, Cercopithecus lomamiensis, in the Lomami River Basin, DR Congo. The primary aim of the study was to examine how lesula fares in the presence of uncontrolled bushmeat hunting. We placed 41 camera traps inside a 4-km2 grid located in the Yawende community conservation area outside the proposed Lomami National Park LNP. We compared an analysis of 72 lesula events over 842 camera trap days from the heavily hunted Yawende site to a pilot camera trap study 38 lesula events over 462 camera trap days at the Losekola study site within the LNP. Our data show an unexpected result: capture probability of lesula 0.08 is the same at both the hunted and non-hunted sites. This is in contrast to the sharp decline in capture probability of all other medium to large terrestrial mammals at the Yawende site. These findings suggest lesula’s cryptic behavior is an important adaptation buffering the species from the impact of hunting. However, hunting pressure on lesula may increase in the near future as hunters adjust effort in response to the decline of less cryptic prey species. Our study also expands knowledge on lesula’s diet, group composition, minimum group size, phenotypic traits, and home range. These findings represent the first new data on lesula since its discovery.
Title: A camera trap study of the cryptic, terrestrial guenon Cercopithecus lomamiensis in central Democratic Republic of Congo.
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Name(s): McPhee, Steven G., author
Ayali, Pablo
Graduate College
Hart, John A.
Detwiler, Kate M.
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Poster
Date Created: 2014
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Florida
Physical Form: pdf
Extent: 1 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: From October-December 2013, we conducted a camera trap study of the newly discovered primate species lesula, Cercopithecus lomamiensis, in the Lomami River Basin, DR Congo. The primary aim of the study was to examine how lesula fares in the presence of uncontrolled bushmeat hunting. We placed 41 camera traps inside a 4-km2 grid located in the Yawende community conservation area outside the proposed Lomami National Park LNP. We compared an analysis of 72 lesula events over 842 camera trap days from the heavily hunted Yawende site to a pilot camera trap study 38 lesula events over 462 camera trap days at the Losekola study site within the LNP. Our data show an unexpected result: capture probability of lesula 0.08 is the same at both the hunted and non-hunted sites. This is in contrast to the sharp decline in capture probability of all other medium to large terrestrial mammals at the Yawende site. These findings suggest lesula’s cryptic behavior is an important adaptation buffering the species from the impact of hunting. However, hunting pressure on lesula may increase in the near future as hunters adjust effort in response to the decline of less cryptic prey species. Our study also expands knowledge on lesula’s diet, group composition, minimum group size, phenotypic traits, and home range. These findings represent the first new data on lesula since its discovery.
Identifier: FA00005157 (IID)
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: FAU Digital Library
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00005157
Restrictions on Access: Author retains copyright.
Owner Institution: FAU