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Diet of the Purple Swamphen in south Florida and invasion pathways of nonnative avian species in Florida

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Date Issued:
2015
Summary:
The spread of nonnative invasive species has become the second greatest threat to global biodiversity, making management of invasive species a critical component of the conservation of biodiversity worldwide. Managers and conservation biologists often lack basic life history data, as well as quantitative and theoretical models to predict risk of invasion or other negative effects. I contribute information to both categories by providing life history information (diet and morphology) of the Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) and by characterizing the invasion pathways that nonnative avian species in Florida follow. I found Purple Swamphens are predominantly eating and selecting for Eleocharis cellulosa. Additionally, there is a large amount of variation in nonnative avian species’ propensity to colonize natural habitat and the time it takes to do so. Nine out of 15 species investigated colonized natural habitat and the time it took them to do so ranged from 8 to 41 years. It is through a combination of various techniques that ecologists will begin to fully understand the importance of studying nonnative species as well as reducing the impact that nonnatives have on native ecosystems.
Title: Diet of the Purple Swamphen in south Florida and invasion pathways of nonnative avian species in Florida.
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Name(s): Callaghan, Corey, author
Gawlik, Dale E., Thesis advisor
Florida Atlantic University, Degree grantor
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Center for Environmental Studies
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation
Date Created: 2015
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: Florida Atlantic University
Place of Publication: Boca Raton, Fla.
Physical Form: application/pdf
Extent: 87 p.
Language(s): English
Summary: The spread of nonnative invasive species has become the second greatest threat to global biodiversity, making management of invasive species a critical component of the conservation of biodiversity worldwide. Managers and conservation biologists often lack basic life history data, as well as quantitative and theoretical models to predict risk of invasion or other negative effects. I contribute information to both categories by providing life history information (diet and morphology) of the Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) and by characterizing the invasion pathways that nonnative avian species in Florida follow. I found Purple Swamphens are predominantly eating and selecting for Eleocharis cellulosa. Additionally, there is a large amount of variation in nonnative avian species’ propensity to colonize natural habitat and the time it takes to do so. Nine out of 15 species investigated colonized natural habitat and the time it took them to do so ranged from 8 to 41 years. It is through a combination of various techniques that ecologists will begin to fully understand the importance of studying nonnative species as well as reducing the impact that nonnatives have on native ecosystems.
Identifier: FA00004433 (IID)
Degree granted: Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2015
Collection: FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
Note(s): Includes bibliography.
Subject(s): Birds--Behavior.
Birds--Habitat.
Adaptation (Biology)
Biological invasions.
Introduced organisms.
Ecological risk assessment--Florida.
Held by: Florida Atlantic University Libraries
Sublocation: Digital Library
Links: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004433
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fau/fd/FA00004433
Use and Reproduction: Copyright © is held by the author, with permission granted to Florida Atlantic University to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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Host Institution: FAU
Is Part of Series: Florida Atlantic University Digital Library Collections.